Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation on Serum Hepcidin Levels among Non-Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: A Randomized Study

Authors

  • Himadri Shankar Department of Nephrology, Aashray Nursing Home & Superspeciality Hospital, Hatia Road, Tilkamanjhi, Bhagalpur, Bihar, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i6.1260

Keywords:

Vitamin D, Hepcidin, Chronic Kidney Disease, Anemia, Cholecalciferol

Abstract

Background: Vitamin D, a fat-soluble vitamin, is necessary for many body processes, such as controlling the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus and preserving strong bones. The objective of the study was to find out how cholecalciferol supplementation affected the levels of haemoglobin, 25(OH)D, and hepcidin in serum in non-diabetic individuals with stage III–IV CKD and vitamin D deficiency.

Methods: 140 individuals with non-diabetic stage III–IV CKD and vitamin D insufficiency, ranging in age from 18 to 70, were enrolled in the study. At baseline and eight weeks, participants were given either a placebo or two oral doses of cholecalciferol (300,000 IU). Assessments for follow-up were carried out after 16 weeks. The levels of serum 25(OH)D and hepcidin were evaluated, respectively. With IBM SPSS Statistics software, version 21.0, statistical analysis was carried out.

Results: A total of 140 people were involved, 70 in each group. Age, gender, and medical parameters were equivalent among the groups' baseline characteristics. At 16 weeks, the cholecalciferol group's serum 25(OH)D levels rose significantly (11.3 ng/ml) in comparison to the placebo group (1.5 ng/ml; p < 0.001). The cholecalciferol group's (Category I) serum hepcidin levels considerably dropped (-3.2 ng/ml) in comparison to the placebo group's (Category II) (-0.5 ng/ml; p = 0.002). In addition, the category I serum haemoglobin levels considerably improved (1.2 g/dL) in comparison to the category II (0.3 g/dL; p = 0.008).

Conclusion: In non-diabetic CKD patients, cholecalciferol administration resulted in considerably higher serum 25(OH)D levels and lower serum hepcidin levels. It also raised haemoglobin levels, suggesting that it might be helpful in treating anaemia linked to chronic kidney disease.

Recommendations: To effectively manage anaemia and other problems in individuals with CKD, more extensive studies are required to confirm these findings and optimise vitamin D administration strategies.

Published

2024-06-30

How to Cite

Himadri Shankar. (2024). Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation on Serum Hepcidin Levels among Non-Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: A Randomized Study. Student’s Journal of Health Research Africa, 5(6). https://doi.org/10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i6.1260

Issue

Section

Section of Non-communicable Diseases Research