Student's Journal of Health Research Africa https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html <p>Student’s Journal of Health Research Africa (SJHR-Africa) is an <strong>open-access DOAJ Indexed International journal</strong> that includes all branches of Medicine and health research to narrow the knowledge gap in Africa and the World over. <strong>The Journal has both Medium (ISSN 2709-9997) Online and (ISSN 3006-1059) Print.</strong> The journal is peer-reviewed and promotes research on the African continent by accepting original research ideas from students who are doing research. </p> <p><strong>Aim &amp; Scope</strong></p> <p>We are a journal for students who believe in sharing information for free. Publishing in a total of 39 sections, SJHR-Africa is here to meet the needs of an African student. We believe that when we integrate Knowledge from different academic disciplines, Africa will be a complete ecosystem with adequate scholarly materials to bridge the knowledge gap.</p> <p>As the world becomes more integrated, our scope extends to biological sciences and vocational studies that have an impact on health such as Agriculture. Informational technology, Environmental science, Business studies, and planning have also been shown to influence Health. The journal brings together individual specialties from different fields into a dynamic academic mix. We intended to enhance communication among health system researchers and administrators, policy and decision-makers, legislators, practitioners, educators, students, and other types of professionals in the research that might affect the healthcare delivery systems.</p> <p><strong>Publishing schedule</strong></p> <p>Our Publication Months are March, June, September, and December of Every year.</p> en-US admin@sjhresearchafrica.org (Editorial Office) David.Serunjogi@sjhresearchafrica.org (David Serunjogi) Sat, 01 Jun 2024 08:58:43 +0000 OJS 3.2.1.1 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 ANALYSING RETROSPECTIVE DATA: AGE AND GENDER DISPARITIES IN HSV-2 INFECTION PREVALENCE AMONGST PATIENTS IN KWAZULU-NATAL. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1023 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a significant global public health concern, contributing to a substantial disease burden. Understanding the prevalence of HSV-2 infections and potential gender disparities is crucial for developing effective prevention and control strategies. This study compares the prevalence of HSV-2 infections between men and women aged 15-49 years.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>This retrospective study analyzed data from 182 patients, both men and women aged 15-49 years, who tested positive for HSV-2. The data were sourced from the Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital laboratory database. Descriptive statistics calculated prevalence rates, and chi-square tests determined significant gender differences. The age groups were divided into five-year intervals to assess prevalence variations across different stages of adulthood.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The analysis revealed notable differences in infection rates between genders. Among females, HSV-2 prevalence ranged from 4.9% in the 15-19 age group to 20.3% in the 20-24 age group, displaying a significant increase during early adulthood. The rates stabilized around 10.4% for ages 25-34, increased to 12.6% for ages 35-39, declined to 8.2% for ages 40-44, and further decreased to 3.6% for ages 45-49. In contrast, among males, HSV-2 prevalence started at 3.3% for ages 15-19, decreased to 2.7% for ages 20-24, steadily increased to 6.6% for ages 30-34, and slightly declined but remained relatively high at 4.4% for ages 35-39, 3.8% for ages 40-44, and 2.7% for ages 45-49.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The study demonstrates a substantial gender disparity in HSV-2 infection rates among individuals aged 15-49 years, with a significantly higher prevalence observed in females. These findings highlight the need for targeted interventions and public health strategies to address the higher burden of HSV-2 infections in women.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation</strong><strong>s</strong></p> <p>Targeted public health strategies and education campaigns should focus more on women, particularly in early adulthood, to reduce HSV-2 transmission rates.</p> Miss. Philile Moyane, Dr. Nhlanhla Wiseman Nsele, Nokukhanya Thembane Copyright (c) 2024 Miss. Philile Moyane, Dr. Nhlanhla Wiseman Nsele, Nokukhanya Thembane https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1023 Thu, 06 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 AWARENESS OF INDOOR AIR POLLUTION AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE USE OF UNCLEAN COOKING FUELS AMONG RESIDENTS OF MBALALA TOWN, MUKONO DISTRICT, UGANDA: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1166 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Background</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">In most low- and middle-income countries, many households still rely on unclean cooking fuels (such as firewood and charcoal) despite the associated indoor air pollution exposure. We assessed people’s awareness of indoor air pollution and factors related to the use of unclean cooking fuels among residents of Mbalala town, Mukono district.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;"> </span><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Methods</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">This was a descriptive cross-sectional study in which we collected both quantitative and qualitative data. Quantitative data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, awareness of indoor air pollution (effects, causes, risks, control measures), and cooking practices (including the use of clean/unclean cooking fuels) from 385 respondents. We computed the proportions of respondents who were aware of indoor air pollution, and who used unclean fuels, and determined the factors associated with using a modified Poisson regression model. Qualitative data were collected from 10 key informants (community leaders and village health teams) and analyzed manually following a thematic framework approach. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Results</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The mean age was 32.5 years (SD: ±11.5). Three-quarters of the respondents (75.3%, n=290) were aware of indoor air pollution. Awareness of indoor air pollution was associated with being 46 years or older, being male, having a tertiary/University education, and earning between US$104 and US$209 monthly. Ninety-four percent (n=350) used unclean cooking fuels. Use of unclean cooking fuels was significantly lower among men than women, and among respondents with primary/secondary education than those without education. Qualitative findings showed that participants used unclean cooking fuels because they were cheaper and accessible. Restrictions on the use of electric appliances by landlords and lack of electricity limited the use of gas cookers or other electric appliances.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Conclusion</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">Despite the high awareness of indoor air pollution, nearly all respondents reported using unclean cooking fuels. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Recommendation</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">Community sensitization on the health risks associated with the continued use of unclean cooking fuels is urgently needed. </span></p> Gloria Namazzi, David Musoke, Joseph K.B Matovu Copyright (c) 2024 Gloria Namazzi, David Musoke, Joseph K.B Matovu https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1166 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED TO ASSESS THE COMMUNITY-RELATED DETERMINANTS INFLUENCING THE UTILIZATION OF ADOLESCENT SEXUAL REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES IN TONG PING AREA JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/337 <p><strong>Background: </strong></p> <p>The study examined the community-related determinants influencing the utilization of ASRH services in the Tong Ping area, Juba South Sudan.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional survey research design whereby 177 adolescents (18-19 years) were interviewed. A probability sampling procedure was used to target the sample population. Quantitative data was organized and analyzed through utilization of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences and findings were presented using the percentage tables. Bivariate and Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors that categorically and jointly influence the utilization of ASRH.</p> <p><strong>Result:</strong></p> <p>The study established that community perception of reproductive health services was positively associated with utilization (P=0.049). The study further found out that there are limited or no public health facilities to provide ASRH in Tong Ping which led to expensive utilization. The study indicated that there are limited health facilities that offer almost no adolescent health care to the users.</p> <p>The study indicated that adolescents have to move long distances to access health services. Tong Ping residents have to travel to either Juba Teaching Hospital or Munuki PHCC to access public treatment. This turns out to be very long distances that require transport costs.</p> <p>However, it found out that the healthcare-seeking behavior makes it difficult to utilize adolescent healthcare services because of the perception in communities that whoever uses reproductive healthcare is a prostitute. It is a taboo for adolescents to seek health services related to reproductive health.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Younger adolescents are inquisitive and have been adequately reached with SRH information and services. Due to cultural beliefs like early marriages, utilization of SRH has been hampered because the assumed users are compromised. Health care is usually sought more in critical conditions than preventive.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>Active sensitization of adolescents should be done through boosting peer education.</p> Noelah Nanzira Copyright (c) 2024 Noelah Nanzira https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/337 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 SOCIETAL-SPECIFIC FACTORS RELATED TO ADHERENCE TO ROUTINE NON-PHARMACOLOGIC INTERVENTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES ATTENDING LUWEERO HEALTH CENTER IV. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/788 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>The study aims to determine societal-specific factors related to adherence to routine non-pharmacologic interventions among patients with chronic illnesses attending Luweero HC IV.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional survey design using questionnaires was adopted to collect data from 326 patients with chronic illnesses visiting Luweero Health Centre IV. This district is located approximately 47 miles from north Kampala. This center was chosen based on the number of patients having chronic illnesses, attending and receiving services. A simple random sampling technique was used to select patients, and only those who met inclusion criteria were interviewed. Purposive sampling was used to select 5 health professionals in charge of chronic illnesses.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Out of the 326 patients who participated in the study, adherence to routine non-pharmacologic interventions due to societal-specific factors was lowest (33.3%) amongst patients with cultural beliefs and highest (74.4%), amongst patients who have no cultural beliefs, highest (61.0%) amongst patients who believed that non-pharmacological treatment takes long, unlike amongst patients whose belief is that herbs and traditionalist treat best 36.2%. The lowest among patients whose cultural practices are ritual performances done on patients by traditionalists is 43.2% and the highest amongst patients whose cultural practice is taking herbs is 78.8%. </p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>All societal factors at multivariate analysis were found to have an impact on adherence to routine non-pharmacological interventions.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>Non-pharmacologic interventionists to design and institute group visiting mechanisms, especially among patients who are unmarried if routine adherence is to be improved.</p> Irene Nakimera, David Serunjogi Copyright (c) 2024 Irene Nakimera, David Serunjogi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/788 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES TOWARDS THE CARE OF EPILEPTIC PATIENTS BY THEIR CARETAKERS ATTENDING THE OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT IN KAPCHORWA HOSPITAL, KAPCHORWA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/568 <p><strong>Background: </strong></p> <p>The specific objectives were to determine the knowledge, and assess attitudes towards the care of epileptic patients among their caretakers, and to explore the common treatment practices done by the caretakers of epileptic patients attending outpatient departments in Kapchorwa Hospital, Kapchorwa District.</p> <p>Methodology:</p> <p>A facility-based cross-sectional study that involved both quantitative and qualitative methods was used. 50 respondents were selected using simple random sampling and interviewed using a questionnaire with closed-ended questions.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>The majority (56%) of the respondents were aged &gt;35, female (64%), Sabinys (84%), Majority (84%) of the participants had heard about epilepsy and more than half (58%) didn’t know about the cause of epilepsy. The majority (96%) of them could recognize when their patients got an attack, less than half (46%) reported that loss of consciousness helped them notice an attack among their patients and less than half (40%) reported that emotional distance made their patients get an attack. The majority (64%) of the participants reported that epileptic patients are normal people, the majority (60%) reported their patients should not be employed, less than half (48%) rushed their patients to the hospital and most (36%) reported lying their patient down as the first aid they gave.</p> <p>Conclusion:</p> <p>Knowledge of the care of epileptic patients by their caretakers was fairly satisfactory their attitude and practices towards the care of epileptic patients were most likely to expose their patients to some degree of stigma and low self-esteem due to their belief that they are mad people, should not be employed nor get married.</p> <p>Recommendations:</p> <p>Health workers attending to epileptic patients and their caretakers at the outpatient department of Kapchorwa Hospital should continue to health educate caretakers to increase awareness about the cause, symptoms, and treatment options for epileptic patients and to decrease the negative attitude of the community.</p> Joy Kisa, Cliffe Atukuma Copyright (c) 2024 Joy Kisa, Cliffe Atukuma https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/568 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES TOWARDS ALCOHOL ABUSE AMONG MEN AGED (20-45) YEARS IN KILHUBO VILLAGE, NGAMBA SUB COUNTY, BUNDIBUGYO DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/566 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>This study aimed to assess "Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices on alcohol abuse among men in Kilhubo Village Bundibugyo District." The specific objectives were: to assess knowledge towards alcohol abuse among men aged 20-45 years, to assess attitude towards alcohol abuse among men aged 20-45 years, and to assess practices towards alcohol abuse among men aged 20- 45 years.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study design was used, and the target population was men aged 20-45 years. A sample size of 70 participants was used and data was obtained by using questionnaires, data were entered into, analyzed, and presented information pie charts, tables, and graphs.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong> </p> <p>Findings from knowledge towards alcohol abuse among me aged 20-45 years revealed that 82%had ever heard of alcohol abuse and knew its side effects, most (65%) knew possible reasons why alcohol is abused outlining some as stress, ready availability, and 34% heard information about alcohol abuse from churches and community events. Regarding results from attitude, 92.9% had a negative attitude, and 76.7% had a positive attitude about alcohol abuse as abusers themselves. Findings from practice revealed that 57.1% drank locally brewed alcohol and 46% drank from bars.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>Generally, the researcher concluded that the majority had ever heard of alcohol abuse and knew its side effects, knew possible reasons why alcohol was abused outlining some as stress, readily availability, heard information about alcohol abuse from churches and community events, had a negative attitude, those who had positive attitude alcohol abuse were abusers themselves, drunk locally brewed alcohol and drunk from bars.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>The researcher recommended that the Ministry of Health should be in touch with the government together with the community members to increase awareness of the effects of alcohol and its outcomes.</p> Sharifah Nabukenya, Cosmas Kabakwa Copyright (c) 2024 SHARIFAH NABUKENYA, Cosmas Kabakwa https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/566 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 ATTITUDE TOWARDS CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING AMONG WOMEN 25-49 YEARS IN ENTEBBE MUNICIPALITY, WAKISO DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/333 <p><strong>Background:</strong> </p> <p>The study aims to assess attitudes towards Cervical Cancer Screening and how they influence the likelihood of women accessing screening services in Entebbe Municipality.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology:</strong> </p> <p>The study used a cross-sectional study. Participants were chosen from each division using proportionate sampling, yielding a total of 246 participants in both divisions. Data from study participants were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The collected data was cleaned, coded, and entered into an MS Excel spreadsheet 2013, after which it was exported to EPI-INFO Version 7 statistical software for Windows for analysis.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> </p> <p>Respondents had a poor attitude which negatively influenced the uptake of cervical cancer screening. The majority would go for a cervical cancer screening test if given the chance (81.3%, 200%). 148 (60.16%) have never been encouraged by their partners or others to go for Cervical Cancer Screening, (68.29%, n=168) presented a neutral response concerning the affordability of Cervical Cancer Screening. (59.76%, n=147) mentioned screening is pleasant, not embarrassing and (56.50%, n=139) were neutral about the painful procedure for Cervical cancer screening. 68(27.87) of the respondents were Single, were married 150(61.48), 6(2.46) were Co- habiting, 17(6.97) were separated and 3(1.23) were Divorced. 28(28.13) had no formal education, 54(21.95) Primary, 128(52.03) Secondary and 44(17.89) had Tertiary level education. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusions:</strong> </p> <p>Women of childbearing age have not yet embraced and owned the responsibility and initiative to utilize and motivate their fellow women to utilize the available cervical cancer screening campaigns even though they know the associated benefits.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation: </strong></p> <p>Continuous sensitization of the community about the benefits of cervical cancer screening should be rolled out and maintained throughout the whole country while emphasizing reassuring women that the examination procedure will still protect their dignity and values. </p> Denis Nsubuga, Maureen Andinda, David Serunjogi Copyright (c) 2024 Denis Nsubuga https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/333 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 A CROSS-SECTIONAL ASSESSMENT ON SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN MUBENDE MUNICIPALITY, UGANDA. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1160 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>Mubende Municipality is a developing municipality located in Uganda's central region. As a result of urbanization, the human population has increased. The rise in population due to industrialization and farming has resulted in increased municipal solid waste (MSW) accumulation. The purpose of this study was to assess solid waste management practices in Mubende municipality, Mubende District.</p> <p><strong> Methods:</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional descriptive design was employed in the study. The South Division, West Division, and East Division are the three municipal divisions where the study was conducted. A simple random sampling technique was used in the investigation to select 400 respondents at random from each of the three divisions. The study's data was collected through observations, interviews, and questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.</p> <p><strong> Results:</strong></p> <p>The sources of MSW in Mubende District were 50.5% households, 21.5% markets, 13.25% commercial areas, 11.5% industries, and 3.25% institutions. Organic waste accounts for the majority of solid waste generated in Mubende (34.50% agricultural waste and 23.0% food waste). Food scraps from households made up 23.00% of municipal solid waste. Plastics and polythene are also considered solid waste accounting for 16.75% and 13.75% respectively. The most common methods of waste management were landfills 45% and burning 27.50%.</p> <p><strong> Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Organic waste accounts for the majority of solid waste generated in Mubende Municipality. Mubende Municipality's preferred solid waste management methods are landfilling, open burning, composting, and indiscriminate dumping. However, these methods are frequently mismanaged, as evidenced by the visible heaps of rotting garbage and scattered and uncollected solid waste.</p> <p><strong> Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>Mubende Municipality officials should consider building and maintaining solid waste collection points to prevent waste from spreading throughout open spaces, streets, and water streams. This will reduce the amount of solid waste dispersed and the resulting unsanitary conditions at central collection sites.</p> Benedict Kalyango, Fortunate Lujjimbirwa, Simon Peter Kaweesa, Amos Ronald Kalukusu, Martin Odoki Copyright (c) 2024 Benedict Kalyango, Fortunate Lujjimbirwa, Simon Peter Kaweesa, Amos Ronald Kalukusu, Martin Odoki https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1160 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 SELF-MANAGEMENT GOAL SETTING AMONG WOMEN DIAGNOSED WITH GESTATIONAL DIABETES MELLITUS; A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY IN A LOW-INCOME SETTING IN CENTRAL UGANDA. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1096 <p><strong>Background:</strong> </p> <p>Copying with a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is very stressful and the task of GDM Self-management is challenging given the circumstances that surround the diagnosis amidst the challenges of pregnancy. In Uganda, little is known about how women diagnosed with the condition manage it through pregnancy. The study assessed the prevalence of self-management goal setting and associated factors among women diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in a low-income setting in central Uganda. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology:</strong> </p> <p>A cross-sectional study was done among 245 women who attended antenatal care in the selected 16 health facilities within Wakiso district, central Uganda who were diagnosed with GDM during their visit to the Clinics from July 2021 to May 2022. Data was collected using telephone interviews, and analyzed using SPSS, the results were reported in the form of tables and figures. Data was collected from March 2023 to May 2023. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The majority 123(53.9%) of the respondents were aged between 28 to 37 years old. Only 17% (n=41) of women diagnosed with GDM managed to set a self-management goal. The common self-management goals set include doing 1-2 Ultrasound scans during pregnancy to monitor the baby 82.93%(n=34%), followed by doing regular exercises 63.41% (n=26) and eating a regular diet every day 53.66% (n=22). </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Only a small proportion of women diagnosed with GDM can set self-management goals with common goals being doing Ultrasound scans, regular exercise, and eating regular diets.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>There is a need for public health specialists to study the factors that might be associated with setting self-management goals in a low-income setting of Wakiso district, Uganda. </p> David Serunjogi, David Livingstone Ejalu Copyright (c) 2024 David Serunjogi, David Livingstone Ejalu https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1096 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 INDIVIDUAL FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO LOWER BACK PAIN AMONG MALES AGED 20 TO 35 YEARS ATTENDING THE SPINAL CLINIC AT MULAGO NATIONAL REFERRAL HOSPITAL IN KAMPALA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1173 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Background</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The gradual increase in cases of Back pain among the general population has been one of the neglected health concerns in developing countries. The study aims to assess the specific individual factors contributing to lower back pain among males aged 20 to 35 years. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Methodology</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">A cross-sectional survey involving the collection of quantitative data from 190 respondents including 14 Surgeons and other doctors, 40 nursing staff, 19 Administrative and support staff, and 108 patients. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Results</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">Prolonged sitting, poor posture, workplace ergonomics, stress, sleep quality, diet, and previous injuries or medical conditions were identified as significant contributors to LBP. Extended periods of sitting lead to an increase in LBP, with a mean score of 4.30. The standard deviation of 0.396 suggests agreement in opinions regarding the influence of poor posture on LBP. A relatively high standard deviation of 1.291 suggests variability in opinions regarding the relationship between stress and lower back pain. The overall mean score for all specific individual factors analyzed is 3.78, with a standard deviation of 0.489, indicating a high level of agreement among respondents regarding the impact of these factors on LBP. Most of the staff fall within the age range of 31 to 40 years, comprising 58% of the total surveyed population followed by staff aged 40 years and above, accounting for 25%. Potential age-related factors that may influence the occurrence of LBP. 53% are male, while 48% are female.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Conclusion</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">Poor posture, workplace ergonomics, stress, sleep quality, diet, and previous injuries or medical conditions were identified as the most significant contributors to LBP. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Recommendation</span></strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">Developing patient education and self-management programs can empower individuals with low back pain to take an active role in managing their condition and preventing recurrences.</span></p> Shafic Kiberu Copyright (c) 2024 Shafic Kiberu https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1173 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 A STUDY ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TRANSVAGINAL SONOGRAPHY AND COLOR DOPPLER IN THE ASSESSMENT OF ENDOMETRIUM IN SUBFERTILE WOMEN COMING TO A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1157 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Ultrasonography (USG) is a very important imaging modality for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of subfertility. Grayscale USG provides structural information about the pelvic organs and color Doppler USG provides functional information along with its vascularity. Adequate blood flow via the uterine arteries and good endometrial perfusion plays a very important role in endometrial receptivity.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Objectives</strong></p> <p>The aim and objective of this study is to assess the mid-luteal phase endometrial spiral artery blood flow by TVS including Doppler, in women coming for the treatment of subfertility to a tertiary care hospital.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Out of 50 patients, primary subfertility comprised 36 individuals while 14 were categorized under secondary subfertility. Most of the patients belonged to the age group of 20-30 years. Of the total number of females 56% conceived, among them 46.43% of patients conceived naturally, followed by IUI (32.14%) and then IVF (21.43%). In our study, 58% of patients presented with an endometrial thickness of over 7 mm, out of which 93.1% conceived successfully. The mean peak systolic velocity in conceived women was 13.18 ± 3.62 cm/s which was higher as compared to 11.55 ± 3.47 cm/s in non-conception menstrual cycles. Similarly, the EDV, Tmax, and Tmin were significantly higher as compared to the not-conceived group. 96.3% of the women who conceived had a lower pulsatility index (&lt; 2.5). The best cut-off value of the resistive index was less than 0.9 for predicting conception status. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The combination of endometrial thickness and Doppler examination of endometrial and sub-endometrial blood flow can be used as a quick and efficient way to enhance the success of assisted reproductive techniques.<strong> </strong></p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>Due to rapid advancement in Doppler technology, it is highly recommended to perform transvaginal USG including Doppler for assessment of Doppler indices mid-luteal phase in subfertile women coming for treatment. </p> Dr . Arjita Bose, Dr. Manisha Kumari, Dr. Sanjay Kumar Suman, Dr . Kalpana Singh, Dr . Nivedita Jha, Dr . Kislay Kumar Copyright (c) 2024 Dr . Arjita Bose1, Dr. Manisha Kumari, Dr. Sanjay Kumar Suman, Dr . Kalpana Singh, Dr . Nivedita Jha, Dr . Kislay Kumar https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1157 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 THE PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AT ADDINGTON HOSPITAL: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY IN DURBAN, KWAZULU-NATAL. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1051 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p><em>Staphylococcus aureus </em>(MRSA) is known to be a prominent public health issue that starts as a nosocomial infection that quickly escalates to catastrophic conditions such as pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, endocarditis, etc. The majority of <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> infections among hospitalized patients are caused by methicillin-resistant<em> Staph. aureus</em> (HA-MRSA) which attributes 20–50% of <em>Staph. aureus</em> infections in South Africa.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>The aim and objectives of the study</strong></p> <p>This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of <em>Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus </em>(MRSA)<em> </em>at Addington Hospital and to monitor patterns of different classes of antibiotics tested on MRSA.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>This research study used a cross-sectional retrospective design with quantitative research analysis. Samples were tested for Microscopy, Culture, and Antibiotic Susceptibility in the microbiology laboratory from January 2021 to December 2021. The investigation focused on the sample population which tested positive for methicillin-resistant <em>Staphylococcus</em> <em>aureus</em>. It was recorded that a positive <em>Staphylococcus aureus </em>culture was used for quality control ensuring the accuracy of the results. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Out of a total of 373 patients with <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> isolates from different clinical specimens, 30(8.04%) were methicillin-resistant and 343 (91.96%) were methicillin-sensitive <em>Staphylococcus aureus </em>(MSSA). Antibiotic susceptibility tests showed that all patient samples were susceptible to vancomycin 373(100%).</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The detection of 8.04% of MRSA in a hospital setting indicates that more work needs to be done to control MRSA prevalence. </p> Siphokazi Lulama Dube, Simangaliso Idiom Shangase Copyright (c) 2024 Siphokazi Lulama Dube, Simangaliso Idiom Shangase https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1051 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 PREVALENCE AND SENSITIVITY PATTERN OF ESBL PRODUCERS IN DIFFERENT CLINICAL ISOLATES FROM A TERTIARY HEALTHCARE CENTER OF EASTERN INDIA, A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/716 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Antimicrobial-resistant organisms have led to increased mortality, morbidity, and economic burden throughout the globe. This study focused on measuring the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance bacteria mostly by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers from several samples in a facility providing tertiary care in Eastern Odisha.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 2021 to January 2022. During that time a total of 2452 culture-positive specimens were processed from different samples. Identification of organisms and antibiotic susceptibility was done manually through Kirby Beuer’s disc diffusion method. Phenotypic detection of ESBL producers was performed by a Double disc synergy test.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>During the study, E. coli (852) was identified as the most prevalent organism followed by S. aureus (661) and K. pneumoniae (301). Among them, 1571 isolates were ESBL-producing and E. coli was the most prevalent one followed by S. aureus and K. pneumoniae which were 659, 479, and 172 in number respectively. Most of the ESBL producers were isolated from urine samples and the least number from stool samples. We found in this study that the highest population of P.mirabilis and K. oxytoca were resistant to the fluoroquinolones group of antibiotics, Pseudomonas and K. oxytoca are highly resistant to aminoglycosides group of antibiotics, P.mirabilis, Enterobacter, P. vulgaris and Enterococci were showing high resistance towards penicillin group of antibiotics, P.mirabilis was highly resistant towards β-lactamase inhibitor group of antibiotics.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>As per the study findings, E. coli is the main producer of ESBLs among members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, and urine is the main source of ESBL-positive isolates. These findings are highly significant from a medical and scientific standpoint and may influence policymakers to better monitor and manage antibiotic resistance.</p> Lipika Jena, Birsen Behera, Dr. Diptimayee Jena, Santosh Singh, Rajashree Panigrahy, Kundan Kumar Sahu, Dattatreya Kar, Suren Kumar Das Copyright (c) 2024 Lipika Jena, Birsen Behera, Diptimayee Jena, Santosh Singh, Rajashree Panigrahy, Kundan Kumar Sahu, Dattatreya Kar, Suren Kumar Das https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/716 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 PREVALENCE, ASSOCIATED FACTORS, DRIVERS AND BARRIERS OF SATISFACTION WITH HIV COUNSELLING AND TESTING SERVICES AMONG ADOLESCENT GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN ATTENDING MILDMAY HOSPITAL: A MIXED-METHODS CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1179 <p><strong>Background</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <p>Uganda faces high HIV/AIDS rates among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW). This study sought to determine the prevalence of satisfaction with HIV counseling and testing services among AGYW. It aimed to identify factors associated with their satisfaction and explored drivers and barriers to their satisfaction with HCT provided at the adolescent and pediatric clinic in Mildmay Hospital.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong>:</p> <p>A mixed methods cross-sectional study was conducted, 385 AGYW aged 15-24 were obtained through systematic random sampling. Quantitative data on patient satisfaction was collected through exit interviews using a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Modified position regression was conducted to determine factors associated with satisfaction with HCT using STATA version 15 software. Qualitative data was obtained through ten in-depth interviews. Data analysis for this was done by transcribing, coding, and extracting themes manually. </p> <p><strong>Results</strong><strong>:</strong><strong> </strong></p> <p>The prevalence of satisfaction with HCT services was 86%. AGYW with the following characteristics had higher odds of being satisfied: primary as the highest level of education APR: 1.17, 95 CI(0.70-1.97), age (23-25), APR: 1.18, 95 CI (0.82-1.70), single APR: 0.93 95 CI (0.69-1.26) and students APR: 1.17, 95 CI(0.80-1.70). Drivers of satisfaction included a friendly and supportive environment, positive interactions with healthcare professionals, and efficient service delivery. Barriers on the other hand included long waiting times and accessibility challenges. </p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <p>High satisfaction with HCT services was found among AGYW. Paying attention to the barriers to satisfaction as mentioned by respondents can significantly enhance satisfaction as well as the quality of HCT services.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <p>The hospital should work towards reducing waiting times, staff communication skills, and providing transportation assistance to AGYW to ensure that they can access the facility whenever they need to. This will help maintain and enhance satisfaction. </p> Norah Nazziwa, Dr. Juliet Ntuulo, Dr. Aggrey Mukose, Rubanga David Atube , Ms. Juliana Namutundu Copyright (c) 2024 Norah Nazziwa, Juliana Namutundu, Aggrey Mukose , Juliet Ntuulo, Rubanga David Atube https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1179 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 ASSESSMENT OF THE KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE OF MOTHERS TOWARDS POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION IN SELECTED SAGAMU COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS, OGUN STATE. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1163 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Postpartum depression (PPD) is of significant public health concern due to the alarming prevalence and adverse consequences among women globally. This study assessed the knowledge and attitudes of mothers towards postpartum depression in selected health care centers in Sagamu community health centers in Ogun State.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>The study utilized a cross-sectional quantitative design. 152 women were selected for the study, a researcher-developed questionnaires were used to collect data from respondents. SPSS version 25 was used for data analysis, and descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present the findings of the study.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Findings from the study revealed that most of the respondents 40.8% were between the ages of 21-25 years old. The majority (66.4%) of the respondents were knowledgeable about postpartum depression and only 58.5% of the respondents indicated a positive attitude toward postpartum depression. Stressful life events during the postpartum period, financial difficulties, sleep deprivation, and traumatic birth experiences were identified as factors responsible for PPD having over 80%. Furthermore, findings also revealed that there is a relationship between the knowledge and attitude of mothers towards postpartum depression (r=0.516, p-values=0.000).</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>In conclusion, mothers in the two selected Sagamu community health centers had a high level of knowledge and only about half had positive attitudes towards the knowledge of PPD.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation </strong></p> <p>There should be an increase in awareness of postpartum depression by healthcare providers among mothers, especially during antenatal visits to reduce stigma and promote help-seeking behavior to improve maternal and child health. Moreover, partners and family members can support and encourage women dealing with postpartum depression. </p> Dr Leslie Tabitha Amere, Adeleye Victoria, Dr Danlami Leslie, Okeh Dominic Copyright (c) 2024 Dr Leslie Tabitha Amere, Adeleye Victoria, Dr Danlami Leslie, Okeh Dominic https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1163 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 CAMPUS-BASED STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS SUICIDE BEHAVIOURS AMONGST STUDENTS AT INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING IN SOUTH AFRICA: A NARRATIVE REVIEW. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1153 <p>Suicide rates among adolescents and youth are increasing regardless of the interventions to lower the risks. Therefore, preventing suicides at institutions of higher learning is a top concern for public mental health. This paper explores strategies that may be adopted to reduce suicidal thoughts among students in South Africa. The study analyzed previously published data on student suicide at institutions of higher learning. The purposive sampling technique was used by the researchers to collect secondary data from various research platforms that were specifically focused on the topic at hand. A non-empirical research design was used where information from Google Scholar, Jstor, EbscoHost, Proquest, Scopus, and Sabinet were sampled and reviewed using keywords and phrases related to suicide, strategies, and behaviors to filter relevant data. This review highlights that there are a variety of causes for students' suicidal thoughts, and these causes are individualized. Suicide prevention strategies such as gatekeeper training programs for suicidal behaviors, implementation of suicide prevention awareness programs within campuses, digitalization of the programs, counseling, and psychotherapy are some of the strategies that universities can adopt to reduce suicidal thoughts among students. Given the complexity of suicide, prevention must be done with extreme prudence and urgency. The more the complexity of the suicide process is understood, the more the need for consistent, significant efforts to empirically support and evaluate the prevention strategies. It is therefore imperative to implement comprehensive and multi-sector preventative programs to minimize these risk factors and enhance protective variables to the greatest extent possible.</p> Tiisetso Aubrey Chuene, Mathibedi Frank Kgarose Copyright (c) 2024 Tiisetso Aubrey Chuene, Mathibedi Frank Kgarose https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1153 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 A STUDENT SUPPORT GUIDING FRAMEWORK TOWARDS IMPROVING GRADUATION RATES FOR A NURSING COLLEGE IN SOUTH AFRICA: A CASE STUDY DESIGN. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1159 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>Student attrition poses a significant challenge to nursing education institutions, leading to health worker shortages in South Africa and globally. This occurs despite implementing student support interventions that appear not to be well-implemented, not escalated, and need organizational structures that enable it. Hence, the purpose of the study was to develop an intentional student support framework that could assist improve student outcomes.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong></p> <p>The process was informed by a prior mixed-method research approach that involved the participation of students and staff in the completion of questionnaires and interviews as stakeholders in a selected nursing college, employing a case study design. </p> <p><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>The quantitative results showed poor pre-enrolment support, in particular participants from disadvantaged communities. Both quantitative and qualitative studies revealed good academic support. However, the qualitative studies highlighted organizational conditions, processes, and practices that hindered the provision of comprehensive support.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong></p> <p>Therefore, a well-coordinated, comprehensive, intentional, and policy-aligned student support guiding framework is presented in this article. </p> <p><strong>Recommendations: </strong></p> <p>The College should implement this comprehensive student support guiding framework across all its campuses to address the diverse needs of its student body and promote their success and well-being.</p> Thembekile Purity Skakane, Ntombifikile Gloria Mtshali, Sandiso Ngcobo Copyright (c) 2024 Thembi, Ntombi, Ntombi, Sandiso Ngcobo https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1159 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 BITE MARKS – A BALANCED PERSPECTIVE https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1061 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The article compliments the recently published manuscript titled “Bite Marks – A Vital Investigation in the Field of Forensic Medicine”. It highlights the importance of bite mark analysis in forensic dentistry for solving crimes. Forensic odonatologists handle dental evidence, which is vital for law enforcement. Although bite marks have historically been used in criminal cases, doubts about their accuracy remain, highlighting the necessity for more uniform methods. Computer-assisted techniques have improved precision, yet obstacles persist in guaranteeing scientific validity and reliability. The President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology stresses the significance of fundamental validity and standardized procedures. Historical cases show the importance of improving analysis techniques. Ultimately, bite mark evidence is essential in court but should be corroborated by other evidence to ensure accuracy and credibility, emphasizing the importance of cooperation for dependability and validity.</span></p> Joe H Smith, M Singh Copyright (c) 2024 Joe H Smith https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1061 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO INCREASED CASES OF EARLY WEANING AMONG MOTHERS OF CHILDREN BELOW 6 MONTHS AT KAYUNGA REGIONAL REFERRAL HOSPITAL, KAYUNGA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/567 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Introduction</span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">;</span></strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The specific objectives were to assess the individual, Health facility, and community-based factors contributing to increased cases of early weaning among mothers of children below 6 months of age in Kayunga National Referral Hospital</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Methodology</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The study was designed with a simple random sampling of the sample population. Data were collected from a sample size of 50 respondents using semi-structured questionnaires written in the English language with open-ended and closed-ended questions and the tools include sheets and pens entered in the computer program presented in tables and figures.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Results</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">Regarding Individual factors 86% were employed, 68% started using bottle feeding before 6 months, 64% used supplementary feeding for children below 6 months, and 54% returned to work within 6 months.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">In regards to health facility-related factors, 56% took their children to nursing centers, 66% were educated on when and how to breastfeed, and 68% were educated on maternal nutrition during lactation. Regarding community-based factors, 76% of the mothers in their communities supported exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months, 62% of their children didn’t receive any herbal medication, and 84% were from monogamous families.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Conclusion</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">Despite the low individual, health facility, and community factors, contributing to increased cases of early weaning among mothers of children below 6 months of age at Kayunga Regional Referral Hospital, the researcher still recognizes that there is a need for mothers to carry out exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of age for proper growth and development of the children.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Recommendations</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The Ministry of Health should enforce the health team so that they can fully provide health services in terms of providing Nutritional Education to mothers on foods to eat during the lactation period and also on how and when to breastfeed.</span></p> Noah Katumba, Sharifah Nabukenya Copyright (c) 2024 Noah Katumba, Sharifah Nabukenya https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/567 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO IMPROPER BIOMEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT AMONG HEALTH WORKERS IN OLI HEALTH CENTRE IV, ARUA DISTRICT. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/544 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Introduction</span></strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The purpose of this study was to determine factors contributing to improper Biomedical Waste management among Health workers in Oli Health Centre IV, Arua District</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The specific objectives of the study were to determine; the individual factors and health facility factors contributing to improper Biomedical waste management among health workers.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Methodology</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The study employed a retrospective study design; a purposive sampling technique was used. Data was collected using a questionnaire on a sample of 50 respondents. Data was analyzed manually by use of tally sheets and entered in the Excel computer program to generate tables graphs and pie charts</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Results</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">M</span></strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">ost of the respondents (60%) who work in Oli Health Centre iv were Nurses, most of the respondents (44%) were married, most of the respondents (60%) were females, most of the respondents (60%) did not receive training on biomedical waste management, most of the respondents (70%) segregated waste, majority of the respondents (96%) do use protective gears, majority of the respondents (64%) agreed that biomedical waste isn’t an extra burden on their work, majority of the respondents (100%) agreed that different wastes are generated by the facility.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Conclusion</span></strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The overall results on individual factors about Biomedical waste management were pleasing in that most of the health workers always segregated waste at the point of generation, and knew the color-coded bins. about health facility related factors biomedical waste management was not so pleasing because few health workers knew about Biomedical waste management plans.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif';">Recommendations</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt;">The health facility should provide more training sessions to Health Workers who are directly involved in medical waste management, and should also disseminate regulatory information which will help health workers to understand the issues and perform their jobs properly in compliance with those regulations.</span></p> PIMER PANACEA , Prosper Mubangizi Copyright (c) 2024 PIMER PANACEA , Prosper Mubangizi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/544 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO DRUG ABUSE AMONG YOUTHS OF NAKASEKE TOWN COUNCIL, NAKASEKE DISTRICT, A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/543 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>(WHO, 2017) defines drug abuse as the harmful or hazardous use of psychoactive substances including alcohol and illicit drugs. It eventually leads to dependence, a cluster of behavioral, cognitive, and physiological phenomena after repeated substance use despite the harmful consequences. </p> <p><strong>Objectives</strong></p> <p>The study aimed to determine how peer group formation among youths, parental supervision, and drug control laws and policies contribute to drug abuse among youths in Nakaseke town council.</p> <p><strong>Research methods</strong></p> <p>The researcher used a descriptive cross-sectional study design. The targeted population was the youths in Nakaseke town council. The sample size was 100 determined by Kish and Leslie’s method. Data was collected using questionnaires and interviews.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>It was revealed that the majority of respondents have peer groups, while 38% of the respondents misuse drugs. Alcohol is the most abused drug followed by Tobacco, marijuana, and others (which included codeine, morphine, tramadol, &amp; NSAIDs). The study findings showed that most people misuse drugs due to peer pressure 34%, depression 21.1%, media influence 18.4%, curiosity 10.5%, and others (such as excitement, passing time, etc.). Many of the respondents knew individuals counseled for getting involved with drugs, 30% knew those who were imprisoned, 22% were not aware of any punishment given to the victims of drug abuse, and 10% of the respondents mentioned that some would undergo mob justice when they are caught.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The study concluded that in contrast to peer group formation among youths and drug control laws and policies, parental supervision does not have a significant impact on drug abuse. </p> <p><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>Youth-based &amp; non-governmental organizations, county &amp; national governments, as well as other relevant stakeholders, should devote maximum attention and resources towards factors against drug abuse effectively. Town council-level strategies also influence the relationship of the other factors with drug abuse.</p> BRANDO SSEMPIJJA, Cliffe Atukuuma Copyright (c) 2024 BRANDO SSEMPIJJA, Cliffe Atukuuma https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/543 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000 THE EFFECTS OF SOCIO-CULTURAL INTERVENTION ON PERCEIVED SOBRIETY IN SELECTED REFERRAL HOSPITALS AND REHABILITATION CENTRES IN KAMPALA AND WAKISO DISTRICTS, UGANDA. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1165 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Alcohol presents a serious challenge worldwide; it is increasingly associated with negative consequences in developing countries including Uganda which bear the heaviest burden of diseases and injuries attributed to alcohol. Alcohol abuse is alarming despite the availability of treatment facilities in Uganda. The study objective was to analyze the effect of recovery interventions on perceived sobriety in Butabika National Referral Hospital and Serenity Rehabilitation Centre in the Wakiso and Kampala districts, Uganda. The post-positivist paradigm guided the study.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>The research adopted a cross-sectional research design with a mixed-method approach known as simultaneous triangulation design. Using purposive sampling and simple random sampling, Data was collected, and questionnaires and interview guides were used. 338 subjects participated in the study. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS, and Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient was employed in hypothesis testing. Primary data was collected using self – self-administered questionnaires and Focused group discussions to obtain in-depth results.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results </strong></p> <p>Sociocultural intervention and perceived sobriety have r=0.544, with a probability value p=0.000 &lt; a=0.01 suggesting a significant correlation. The null hypothesis was rejected; which implies that sociocultural intervention significantly positively correlates with perceived sobriety at a one percent level of significance. “Culturally, alcohol is taken when twins were born and at the initiation “wall” ceremony, a day for receiving the twins into the family, the birth of a new baby, marriage introduction, paying dowry and wedding ceremonies”.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion </strong></p> <p>The more socio-cultural intervention is utilized in treatment facilities, the more sobriety is realized. Therefore, having workable socio-cultural intervention would help to reduce perceived sobriety.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation </strong></p> <p>The Ministry of Health through the mental health desk office encourages mental health practitioners to empower therapists in the treatment facilities to give more attention to using sociocultural intervention to address beliefs about excessive use of alcohol.</p> Celestine Lindrio , Dr. Kiyingi Pio Frank (PhD), Dr. Nyende Paul (PhD) Copyright (c) 2024 Celestine Lindrio https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1165 Sat, 01 Jun 2024 00:00:00 +0000