Student's Journal of Health Research Africa https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html <p>Student’s Journal of Health Research Africa (SJHR-Africa) is an <strong>open-access DOAJ Indexed International journal</strong> that includes all branches of Medicine and health research to narrow the knowledge gap in Africa and the World over. <strong>The Journal has both Medium (ISSN 2709-9997) Online and (ISSN 3006-1059) Print.</strong> The journal is peer-reviewed and promotes research on the African continent by accepting original research ideas from students who are doing research. </p> <p><strong>Aim &amp; Scope</strong></p> <p>We are a journal for students who believe in sharing information for free. Publishing in a total of 39 sections, SJHR-Africa is here to meet the needs of an African student. We believe that when we integrate Knowledge from different academic disciplines, Africa will be a complete ecosystem with adequate scholarly materials to bridge the knowledge gap.</p> <p>As the world becomes more integrated, our scope extends to biological sciences and vocational studies that have an impact on health such as Agriculture. Informational technology, Environmental science, Business studies, and planning have also been shown to influence Health. The journal brings together individual specialties from different fields into a dynamic academic mix. We intended to enhance communication among health system researchers and administrators, policy and decision-makers, legislators, practitioners, educators, students, and other types of professionals in the research that might affect the healthcare delivery systems.</p> <p><strong>Publishing schedule</strong></p> <p>Our Publication Months are March, June, September, and December of Every year.</p> SJC Publishers Company Limited en-US Student's Journal of Health Research Africa 3006-1059 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES OF MOTHERS/CAREGIVERS ON HOME MANAGEMENT OF DIARRHEA IN CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS RECEIVING CARE AT ENTEBBE HOSPITAL: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/964 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Diarrhea is the leading killer worldwide accounting for approximately 8% of all death among under-five children despite the availability of simple effective treatment. A study in this regard was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practices of mothers/caregivers on home management of Diarrhea in children under five years. Specifically, the study sought to examine the knowledge of mothers/caregivers on home management of Diarrhea in children under five years, to assess the attitudes of mothers/caregivers on home management of Diarrhea in children under five years, and to finally determine the practices of mothers/caregivers in home management of Diarrhea in children under five years. </p> <p><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>The study targeted a sample of 106 respondents (mothers/caretakers) of age group 16-50 years with children less than five years of both sexes experiencing diarrhea symptoms attending any service at Entebbe Hospital.</p> <p><strong>Findings</strong></p> <p>In terms of the knowledge of mothers/caregivers on home management of Diarrhea in children under five years, results from the findings indicated that of most of the respondents, 50.0% indicated unclean water as the main cause of diarrhea in children with the least indicating excessive cold. About attitudes of mothers/caretakers on home management of diarrhea in children under five years, most of the mothers (86.8%) believed that diarrhea was preventable, 12.3% of the respondents did not believe that diarrhea was preventable while 0.9% of the respondents did not know. Turning to practices of mothers/caretakers on home management of diarrhea in children under five years, most of the respondents, 44.3% indicated that they would go to a health facility when their children have diarrhea with the least, 1.9% of the respondents opting to go to a traditional herbalist.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>It is therefore recommended that the government should support community sensitization programs on the diarrhea infection and their management. </p> Otile Samuel Derrick Nowamani Copyright (c) 2024 Otile Samuel, Derrick Nowamani https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 11 11 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.964 FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO THE PREVALENCE OF WASTING AMONG CHILDREN BELOW FIVE YEARS RECEIVING HEALTHCARE SERVICES AT KAYUNGA REGIONAL HOSPITAL, KAYUNGA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/791 <p><strong>Objectives of the study</strong></p> <p>The main purpose of this study was to determine the factors contributing to the prevalence of wasting among children below five years receiving health care services at Kayunga Regional Referral Hospital; the study focused on three objectives that are to determine the prevalence of wasting as well as to assess the childhood factors and maternal factors contributing to wasting.</p> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>A hospital-based descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2023 and July 2023 at Kayunga Regional Referral Hospital in Kayunga District. Data was collected using questionnaires &amp; simple random sampling technique was employed to select 100 study participants. Data was analyzed using Microsoft Excel version 2016 and a scientific calculator.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Data analysis and interpretation showed that 9% of the children below five years who received health care services at Kayunga Regional Referral Hospital during the time of data collection were wasted. The findings of this study further showed that 77.8% of the study participants who were wasted had severe wasting while 22.2% of them were moderately wasted. The study results reflected that 41.7% of the study participants who had a birth weight &lt; 2.5kg were wasted while 6% of those who had a birth weight of 2.5-4.0kg were wasted. The study findings indicated that 11.8% of the children who had early initiation of complementary feeding were wasted as compared to the 7.7% and 7.1% who had timely as well as late initiation of complementary feeding respectively.<strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>Wasting is still a national, medical, and public health concern among children below five years old in several districts of the country including Kayunga District.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>The study recommends combined efforts from different stakeholders like the government, Ministry of Health, health practitioners, Village Health Teams, and local leaders to curb malnutrition, particularly wasting in the country.</p> IBRAHIM SSEBATA DAISY KIYINGI Copyright (c) 2024 IBRAHIM SSEBATA , MRS. KIYINGI DAISY https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 12 12 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.791 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES ABOUT BIOMEDICAL WASTE SEGREGATION AND MANAGEMENT AMONG HEALTH WORKERS AT KAJJANSI HEALTH CENTRE IV, WAKISO DISTRICT UGANDA: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/967 <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Background</span></strong></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> This study aims to assess health workers’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards biomedical waste segregation at Kajjansi Health Centre IV.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Methodology</span></strong></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">This research study was carried out at Kajjansi Health Centre IV. The hospital is located in Kajjansi Town, Busiiro South, Wakiso district Uganda. The hospital segregates waste in color-coded waste bins. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Data was then analyzed manually through tallying and then entered into a computer.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The data gathered was then analyzed using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) and results were presented using appropriate tables and graphs.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Results</span></strong></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The majority of the health workers at Kajjansi Health Centre IV were interns being a population of 29 (47%), doctors being 2 (03%), and lab technicians having the least numbers at 4 technicians from the study. It was also found that most of the health workers collected general and biomedical wastes differently that is 42 of the respondents practiced it and 8 did not carry out the practice. 40 of the respondents picked up waste with rubber gloves when on the ground, while 20 only wore gloves at times and 2 never used gloves at all.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">When it came to cleaning spills of liquid of biomedical wastes with proper procedure, 40 respondents sometimes practiced the procedure and 20 carried out the proper procedure while 2 did not carry out the procedure.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Conclusion</span></strong></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Education level, health workers in their specialty played and correlated with the knowledge about health waste disposal and segregation, here medical doctors appeared to have the highest knowledge.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Recommendations</span></strong></p> <p style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Health management committees should impose tough measures where all health workers attend training and workshops on biomedical waste management and segregation. </span></p> Shamim Akanduhura Samuel Otile Copyright (c) 2024 Akanduhura Shamim, Samuel Otile https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.967 FACTORS INFLUENCING THE PREVALENCE OF MALARIA AMONG CHILDREN BELOW 10 YEARS AT NYIMBWA HEALTH CENTER IV, LUWEERO DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/816 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>Broad objective: To assess the factors influencing the prevalence of malaria among children below 10 years at Nyimbwa Health Center IV, Luweero district.</p> <p>Specific objectives: To determine, evaluate, and assess the demographic, economic, and environmental factors that influenced the prevalence of malaria among children below 10 years at Nyimbwa Health Center IV, Luweero district.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study in which both qualitative and quantitative data were collected from a sample of 81 respondents who were obtained using a simple random sampling technique, The data collection method was a face-to-face interview using a questionnaire.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Malaria cases were children aged between 9 and 10 years( 33%),60% lived in villages, 52% of cases were males and 48% females, 42% were Baganda, (46%) from families earning between UGX 110,000 to 300,000 monthly, 79% from houses constructed with cement, 89% used latrines,52% got water from boreholes,72% lived in homes with nearby stagnant water (72%).85% lived in houses with no holes, 79% reared some animals and 57% disposed of wastes in rubbish pits.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions:</strong></p> <p>The study established that factors like the age and sex of the children, the economic status of the family, presence of stagnant water greatly influenced the prevalence of malaria. Other factors included education levels of guardians, religions, places of residence, source of water for domestic purposes, method of excreta, and waste disposal.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations:</strong></p> <p>Guardians should make sure children sleep under treated mosquito nets, exclusive breastfeeding for at least the first six months and a balanced diet for older children, clearing bushes and draining stagnant water near homes to keep away from breeding mosquitoes. Health workers should create awareness of malaria prevention and effective treatment of positive cases. The government should equip health facilities with adequate staff, drugs, and necessary equipment, and timely delivery of free mosquito nets to the population.</p> SAMUEL KATENDE FLORENCE NAMUTEBI Copyright (c) 2024 Samuel Katende, Florence Namutebi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 11 11 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.816 A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY ON THE PERSPECTIVE OF MEDICAL STUDENTS ON ONLINE TEACHING DURING THE CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) PANDEMIC, HIMACHAL PRADESH, INDIA. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1020 <p><strong>Background: </strong></p> <p>The COVID-19 crisis has propelled the educational sector into uncharted territories, necessitating the abrupt transition to online learning. Utilizing electronic technology for teaching and learning offers a promising avenue for continuous education, facilitating interactions between teachers and students. Despite its benefits, this shift has unveiled numerous challenges, impacting the efficacy of digital education.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong></p> <p>To explore these challenges, an online survey was conducted using Google Forms, aimed at gathering the experiences and opinions of students. The survey targeted 120 first-year MBBS students at DYSPGMC, Nahan, who had participated in online teaching. Out of these, 75 students responded and were willing to provide feedback on their online learning experience.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>The survey revealed critical issues affecting online learning, including poor internet connectivity exacerbated by high traffic, and concerns about audio and video quality during live-streamed classes. Despite these challenges, online classes were generally well-received, with most students finding them acceptable and beneficial for their professional growth, given the extensive curriculum and time constraints.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong></p> <p>The study highlights significant obstacles in the implementation of online learning, such as connectivity issues and the quality of live-streamed classes. Nonetheless, the acceptance of online classes among students indicates a positive shift towards e-learning, emphasizing its potential role in facilitating continuous professional development.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations: </strong></p> <p>It is recommended to integrate e-learning into the existing curriculum, considering the positive feedback and suggestions from students. Efforts should also be made to address the identified challenges, particularly improving internet infrastructure and the quality of online delivery, to enhance the effectiveness of online learning in future educational settings.</p> Rachna Mehandiratta Vikrom Takkar Preeti Takkar Kapila Purnima Jindal Copyright (c) 2024 Rachna Mehandiratta, Vikrom Takkar, Preeti Takkar Kapila, Purnima Jindal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 7 7 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1020 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICES OF MALARIA PREVENTION AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINIC AT GOMA HEALTH CENTER III, MUKONO DISTRICT: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/965 <p><strong>Objectives</strong></p> <p>To determine the level of knowledge, attitude and practices about malaria prevention among the pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at Goma Health center III. Methodology: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional study that involved the use of quantitative approach of data collection and analysis. Consent from 145 pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at Goma Health center III was sought before participation into the study, they answered questions in the questionnaires in line with the study objectives and the results data was stored in Microsoft excel and analysed using stara version 14.0.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Out of the 145 pregnant women who participated, 87 of them (60%) were aged between 21-40 years, and only a few were aged 45 years and above. All of them had heard about malaria in pregnancy whereby most of them (98, 67.58%) had heard about it from health facilities. They all believed that mosquitoes were the Vectors that spread malaria, but a few were ignorant about its transmission where 6 (4.13%) believed it was transmitted by coming into contact with a malaria patient, other 6 (4.13%) by eating contaminated food, some 2 (1.37%) believed in transmission by eating so many mangoes.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The participants ‘basic knowledge about malaria in pregnancy was good because all of them (100%) had heard about it and most of them knew its correct transmission, signs and symptoms, and prevention measures. Their attitudes towards malaria prevention were not so good because most of them strongly agreed that the disease is serious and life-threatening, their practices towards malaria prevention were good.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>The researcher therefore recommends that more health education should be done about malaria transmission to ensure excellent knowledge, self-medication should be strongly condemned because most Africans believe in it but it is risky to pregnant women.</p> <p> </p> Hope Pauline Mutesi Judah Turumanya Samuel Otile Copyright (c) 2024 Mutesi Hope Pauline , Judah Turumanya , Samuel Otile https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.965 PREVALENCE AND FACTORS INFLUENCING TUBERCULOSIS AMONG PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV SEEKING HEALTH CARE AT THE ART CLINIC IN KAWAALA HEALTH CENTRE IV- KAMPALA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/851 <p><strong>Background </strong></p> <p><strong> </strong>This study specifically assessed the prevalence of Tuberculosis among PLWHIV, the social and cultural factors, and the socio-economic factors contributing to the prevalence of Tuberculosis in HIV/AIDS in patients seeking health care in Kawaala Health Center IV in Kampala district. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>The study adopted a cross-sectional research design with a quantitative approach to data collection where 96 respondents were conveniently sampled and data was gathered from them using questionnaires and self-administration questionnaire method of data collection.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The study established that out of 96 respondents, 10 (10.4%) had TB while 86 (89.6%) of the HIV patients studied did not have TB. Among the 10 who had TB, 07 (70%) were male and females were 03 (30%). The study further indicated that out of 96 respondents, 51 (53.1%) did not have a family history of TB however, 56 (58.3%) were active smokers and 63 (66%) did not drink alcohol but 50 (52.1%) of those who drank did so from the joints with their friends and 80 (83%) did not have any TB patient that they were closed to. The study also established that out of 96 respondents, 60 (62.5%) were unemployed of which 58 (60.4%) had an income level of below 200,000 shillings with 67 (70%) being rural residents.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion </strong></p> <p>The study therefore concluded that the prevalence of TB among HIV patients was high, most especially among male patients with the prominent socioeconomic factors being unemployment, income level of below 200,000 shillings, rural residency, and overcrowding while active smoking and drinking from the joints with friends were the prominent socio-cultural factors.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>The study recommends the government establish collaboration between TB and HIV programs which should be strengthened by creating a coordinating body to ensure very close collaborative activities to avoid leakages in the referral system for both programs. </p> PATRICK BAGUMA NEGESA JUSTINE KAFEERO Copyright (c) 2024 PATRICK BAGUMA, NEGESA JUSTINE KAFEERO https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.851 PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AMONG YOUTH AGED 15 -30 YEARS SEEKING HEALTH CARE. A PROSPECTIVE CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. AT C-CARE INTERNATIONAL HOSPITAL KAMPALA. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/909 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infections among youth aged 15-30 years seeking health care services at C- CARE IHK. The specific objectives were to determine the prevalence, and infection patterns among various age groups and genders and also find out the risk factors influencing the prevalence of H. pylori infections among youth aged 15-30 years attending C- CARE IHK.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A prospective cross-sectional study design using both quantitative and qualitative methods was conducted. A questionnaire was used to collect qualitative data from patients' age, gender, and other relevant data that gathered data to meet and answer the objectives of the study. Prevalence was determined by collecting and testing stool samples using stool H. pylori antigen kits and then results were entered into a result sheet. A convenient way of sampling was used to select eligible participants and a sample size of 88 was obtained.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Out of the 88 samples analyzed, 47% were positive for H. pylori infection while 53% were negative. The most affected were males at 53.7%, the age group was (25-30) years at 63.4% and the least affected age group was (15-19) years at 12.2%. people living in town (75.6%), people of no level of education (51.2%), alcoholism, and smoking (73.2%,34.1%) were the factors associated with the prevalence of H. pylori infection.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The prevalence of H. pylori was relatively high, towns and unhygienic conditions predisposed the majority of the patients while the age of 25-30 was affected mostly.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>The Ministry of Health should advocate for the testing of youth for H. pylori infection to put more emphasis on sensitizing youth about how it’s acquired, spread, and prevented and the complications of H. pylori.</p> SHABAN SSEWANKAMBO frank ssegujja Janefrank Nalubega Copyright (c) 2024 SHABAN SSEWANKAMBO, frank ssegujja, Janefrank Nalubega https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 9 9 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.909 EFFECTS OF RESULTS BASED FINANCING ON PERFORMANCE OF THE INCENTIVIZED INDICATORS. A QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL STUDY DESIGN. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/860 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Despite the nationwide roll-out of RBF, the National performance of several key incentivized indicators showed a decline in performance in the year 2019/2020 compared to the previous year. </p> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>The study took on a quasi-experimental study design. Data from HFs that were part of phase one of the RBF rollout (exposed group) was analyzed and compared to data from HFs in phase three of RBF implementation (Nonexposed group) a time before the rollout of RBF phase three in Uganda. All data analysis was done in Stata using version 16.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong><strong>:</strong> </p> <p>The study results show that in the exposed group of health facilities, Incentivised indicators changed significantly after the project implementation as regards the average number (mean) of clients served by the health facilities; p&lt; 0.01, p&lt;0.05, or p&lt;0.1 for the difference coefficients Similar, though relatively slower effects were observable in the same indicators for an unexposed group of health facilities. IPT2 coverage declined by 6%, health facility deliveries were 59% achieved (89% national target) and declined by 3%, and under-five Vitamin A coverage declined by 9% to 21.4% far below the target of 66%. Essential drug stock declined by 7%, to 46% below the national target of 75% maternal deaths increased by 7.6%, reporting timeliness declined by 12.5% from 97.5% public health facility staffing declined by 3% to 73% against the targeted 80%.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>RBF contributes to improved health service utilization as evidenced by the improved performance of incentivized indicators and improved data quality over time. </p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>There is a need to continuously review which indicators are incentivized to achieve quality of care in all health services if it is to be mainstreamed.</p> Doreen Musiime Angela Namwanje Kawooya Copyright (c) 2024 Doreen Musiime, Angela Namwanje Kawooya https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 17 17 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.860 OVERWEIGHT AND JUNK SNACKING AMONG THE FEMALE STUDENTS IN HIGHER INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING. A CASE STUDY AT MILDMAY INSTITUTE OF HEALTH SCIENCES. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/966 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>This study aims to investigate overweight and junk snacking among female students in higher institutes of learning.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A case study research design was used because the findings of one case can be generalized to other related phenomena. The researcher therefore used both qualitative and quantitative research methods for collecting and analyzing data to describe and interpret it into information. The target population of the study was thirty (114) respondents from which a study sample is selected. The study population consisted of both staff and female students at Mildmay institute of Health Sciences.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p> 62% of the respondents were female and 38% were male, thereby indicating that the respondents who were approached females were more than males since they were most category who depend on junk foods. </p> <p>The study findings revealed that they have never had any competitive game in their lives this was supported by 65% of the respondents, 31% reported that they have ever had a competitive game and finally 4% reported that the do not remember whether they had a competitive game or not. This implies that most of them did not have competitive games and they should engage in physical exercises to cover come overweight.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>Physical exercises in form of games have helped many students to improve on health because it makes them to avoid of the diseases related to overweight. Playing of games enable students and other categories of people to avoid overweight related challenges like obesity.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>The study recommends that providing Healthy Food Options has to be done: Service providers should ensure that healthy food options are readily available in school cafeterias, vending machines, and snack bars. Increase the availability of fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein sources.</p> <p><br /><br /></p> Emmanuel Lukwata Samuel Otile Copyright (c) 2024 Emmanuel Lukwata , Samuel Otile https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 14 14 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.966 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICES TOWARDS EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING AMONG PRIMIPARA MOTHERS AT LUGASA HEALTH CENTER III KAYUNGA DISTRICT; A DESCRIPTIVE CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/857 <p><strong>Introduction: </strong></p> <p>The main purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitude, and practices towards exclusive breastfeeding among primiPara mothers at Lugasa Health Center iii, Kayunga district; the study focused mainly on three objectives that are to determine the knowledge, to determine the attitude and to assess the practices towards EBF among primiPara mothers.</p> <p><strong>Method</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>A hospital-based descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2023 and April, 2023 at Lugasa health center iii in Kayunga District. Data was collected using questionnaires and a simple random sampling technique was employed to select 130 study participants. Data was analyzed using Microsoft Excel and a scientific calculator.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>Data analysis and interpretation showed that 61.5% of the respondents defined EFB as feeding babies on breast milk only, 91.5%, knew breast milk as the cheapest and recommended food for the newly born baby, 48.5% knew that babies should be breastfed on breast milk only for the first six months of life 60% of respondents knew that a baby should be breastfed eight times and more in a day and 76% knew that EFB decreases childhood diseases and death. The study results reflected that 68.5% of the study respondents perceived the act of EBF as an easy process, and 49% reported the act of breastfeeding in public also to be okay.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>The majority of the study respondents had satisfactory knowledge, favorable attitudes, and good practices towards EBF. However, the practice of EBF in the study area is still lower than the set national target of the prevalence of EBF and the WHO set global prevalence of EBF.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>The study recommends combined efforts from different stakeholders like the government, Ministry of Health, District Health Teams, and health workers to promote appropriate Infant and young child Feeding Practices like EBF in the country.</p> BUSHIRAH KABWIRE DAVID KANSIIME Copyright (c) 2023 BUSHIRAH KABWIRE, DAVID KANSIIME https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 14 14 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.857 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES ABOUT EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING AMONG MOTHERS AGED 18-49 YEARS ATTENDING SEKANYONYI HEALTH CENTRE IV IN MITYANA DISTRICT. ACROSS-SECTIOAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/855 <p><strong>Background:</strong> Exclusive breastfeeding is the situation in which an infant receives only breast milk from his/her mother or a wet nurse for the first six months and no other solids or liquids with the exception of drops or syrups consisting of vitamins, minerals, supplements or medicines.</p> <p><strong>Method</strong>: A descriptive crossectional study with quantitative approaches was used, 96 respondents were selected using simple random sampling technique, data was collected using a questionnaire and was analyzed using descriptive statistics of frequencies and percentages.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong>: Study findings indicated that the respondents had good knowledge about exclusive breastfeeding since majority 90 (94%) had ever had about exclusive breastfeeding, majority 80 (83%) were aware of the duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and 50 (52%) knew that breast milk reduces the risk of some non-communicable diseases. A generally fair attitude towards EBF among mothers was achieved as 94 (97.9%) agreed that giving breast milk to a new borne within an hour of birth is important 95 (98.9%) agreed that breastfed babies are healthier than non-breastfed babies and only 16 (16.7%) agreed that EBF reduces the weight gained during pregnancy. Regarding the practice of exclusive breastfeeding, it was fairly good with majority 90 (93.8%) giving their babies the colostrum, 84 (87.5%) initiated breastfeeding within an hour of birth and 48 (50%) were still breastfeeding at the time of the study.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong>: it was therefore concluded that there was a high level of knowledge, fair attitude and a fairly good practice of EBF.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation:</strong> The health workers of Sekanyonyi Health Centre IV as well as the Ministry of Health in Uganda should ensure continuous sensitization of the community about the relevance of EBF and the dangers of not doing so. </p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Patricia Nannono Lydia Anywar Copyright (c) 2024 Patricia Nannono, Lydia Anywar https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 8 8 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.855 FACTORS INFLUENCING INSECTICIDE-TREATED MOSQUITO NET UTILISATION AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTE NATALCARE AT KAPCHORWA GENERAL HOSPITAL IN KAPCHORWA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/853 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>The factors influencing utilization of insecticide-treated mosquito nets among pregnant women attending ANC at Kapchorwa General Hospital.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study of 100 respondents was used for the study. A simple random sampling technique was used and data collected using survey and interviewing methods was presented and analyzed using descriptive frequencies and percentages using Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Word.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>From the results, the majority 92(92%) of respondents said they knew about ITNs, the majority 58(58%) of respondents heard about ITNs from ANCs a majority 67(67%) said ITNs prevent malaria, a majority 89(89%) of respondents were willing to use ITNs, a majority 82(82%) were willing to recommend others to use ITNs, a majority 85(85%) said that sleeping under ITNs does not cause suffocation, a majority of married 92(92%) and high-income earners 65(74%), and mothers aged between 15 – 30 Years, 72(92%) were all utilizing ITNs.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>From the results, the majority of respondents said that they knew about ITNs the majority of respondents heard about ITNs from ANC, and from the radio, the majority of respondents were willing to use ITNs, and a majority were willing to recommend others to use ITNs, majority of b married women were sleeping under ITNs, a majority of the individuals earning high income were sleeping under ITNs, and the majority of the mothers aged between 15 – 30 Years, were sleeping under ITNs.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>Health workers and VHTs should encourage mothers to go to their nearest health facilities for antenatal visits, Health workers should health educate the mothers about the benefits of sleeping under ITNs to improve their attitude, Government should provide free ITNs to pregnant mothers to increase the utilization of ITNs.</p> PAUL CHEMUTAI JUSTINE NEGESA Copyright (c) 2024 PAUL CHEMUTAI, JUSTINE NEGESA https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.853 TITLE - BITE MARKS – A VITAL INVESTIGATION IN THE FIELD OF FORENSIC MEDICINE AND FORENSIC ODONTOLOGY – SYSTEMATIC REVIEW. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1026 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>The application of dental knowledge, which is common among dental healthcare providers, to the fields of law enforcement and death investigations is known as forensic odontology.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Material and Methods</strong></p> <p>Major databases such as Medline were explored detailed literature search resulting in a systematic review of bite marks.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p> Four original research scientific articles dated between 2020 – 2024 about bite marks were highlighted. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusions</strong></p> <p>Forensic dentists are important in a variety of situations, even though postmortem dental identification is a well-known practice in cases when a deceased person cannot be recognized by traditional methods like fingerprints, scars, markings, tattoos, medical implants, and DNA. Detailed information regarding bite marks and their vital role in the field of forensic medicine and forensic odontology is discussed in this systematic review.</p> KARTHIK SHUNMUGAVELU VINOD KUMAR P Copyright (c) 2024 Dr. KARTHIK SHUNMUGAVELU , VINOD KUMAR P https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 9 9 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1026 ANTEPARTUM HEMORRHAGE A THREAT TO MATERNAL AND CHILDBIRTH OUTCOMES: COMMENTARY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/984 Francis Ogwang Copyright (c) 2024 Ogwang Francis https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 4 4 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.984 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ADHERENCE TO DOLUTEGRAVIR-BASED REGIMEN AMONG ADULT HIV/AIDS PATIENTS ATTENDING ANTI RETRO VIRAL THERAPY CLINIC AT MILDMAY UGANDA HOSPITAL. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/619 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>The purpose of the study was to determine the adherence and factors associated with adult HIV patients on DTG regimens attending the ART clinic at Mildmay Uganda Hospital.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>This was a cross-sectional study design that used quantitative methods of data collection methods. Systematic sampling techniques were used to enroll every 2<sup>nd</sup> patient on DTG daily into the study. Data was analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2013 and presented using tables, pie charts, and graphs.</p> <p>Of the 30 respondents, non-adherence was 30% and this was common among participants aged 21-30 years (67%), those who had attained secondary school education level (67%), those taking alcohol (56%) and those not taking medication in time (56%).</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>Most of the study participants 15(50%) were aged 21-30 years. The prevalence of non-adherence was high (30%) and was common among youthful adults (21-30 years), with poor social behaviors like taking alcohol, low socio-economic status and not taking medication on time. Study findings showed that the majority (33%) of the non-adhering respondents were peasant farmers and this is where they earn their living.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong></p> <p>The prevalence of non-adherence was at 30% and was characterized by many factors. These were respondents aged between 21 and 30 years of age, young adults without partnership support, low education level, poor social behaviors like taking alcohol, low economic status, and those poor timing for taking drugs.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations: </strong></p> <p>The Ministry of Health should strengthen sensitization programs on DTG adherence through HIV treatment programs like community outreaches and community drug refills where HIV patients can be followed up and given drug refills from their homes.</p> Griffin Amutuhaire Tobius Mutabazi Copyright (c) 2024 Griffin Amutuhaire , Tobius Mutabazi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 12 12 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.619 PREVALENCE AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HYPERTENSION AMONG ADULTS AGED 18-50 YEARS ATTENDING HIV CLINIC AT ENTEBBE REGIONAL HOSPITAL IN WAKISO DISTRICT. A CROSS–SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/613 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>In Uganda, about 18% of HIV-infected adults are suffering from hypertension. The comorbidity of hypertension doubles the morbidity and mortality among hypertensive patients thereby hindering the attainment of the third sustainable development goal. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with hypertension among adults aged 18-50 years attending the HIV clinic at Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Wakiso district.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong></p> <p>A descriptive cross–sectional study design that enrolled 75 respondents who were selected using a systematic sampling method was conducted. Data was collected using self – administered questionnaires and results were analyzed using STATA version 15 and results were presented in tables and pie charts.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>The study revealed that social-demographic factors like male gender (58.8%), age category 41 – 50 years (64.7%), having attained tertiary education (35.3%), being married (70.6%), body weight of above 75 kilograms (47.1%) and formal employment (47.1%) were associated with hypertension. Clinical characteristics associated with hypertension were CD4 counts of 200 – 500 cells/mm<sup>3</sup>, viral load of over 200 copies/ml, and other chronic illnesses (64.7%). Alcoholic consumption (52.9%) and not engaging in physical exercises (64.7%) were some of the behavioral and lifestyle characteristics that influenced hypertension.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The prevalence of hypertension among adult HIV patients aged 18 – 50 years was high (22.7%) mainly associated with older age, male gender, high body weight, sedentary lifestyle, and presence of comorbidities.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>The Ministry of Health should incorporate comprehensive hypertension care into HIV care to increase accessibility since there is a higher prevalence among this population</p> ALICE TUMUSIIME TOBIUS MUTABAZI Copyright (c) 2024 TUMUSIIME ALICE, Tobius Mutabazi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 8 8 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.613 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICES ON NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL AMONGST HEALTH WORKERS IN MUBENDE REGIONAL REFERRALHOSPITAL, MUBENDE DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/813 <p><strong>Background</strong> <br />Nosocomial infection rates are still high and have rather steadily increased during the recent decade, this can be due to the carelessness of health workers, failure to observe and adopt standard operating procedures, and poor waste segregation and disposal. This study aims to assess the knowledge attitude and practices on nosocomial infection prevention and control among health workers in Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, Mubende district<br /><strong>Methodology</strong><br />A descriptive cross-section study employing a quantitative method was used, where 50 participants were selected using a simple random sampling method, data was collected using semi-structured questionnaires, and results were entered into the computer data program and Microsoft Excel for frequency tables<br /><strong>Results</strong><br />60% mentioned that blood-borne infections are the most commonly occurring born infections, and 78% of the respondents said patients were the most common sources of hospital-acquired infections to health workers. 80% of respondents thought working in a hospital exposes you to infection with 60% thinking that his /her family members may get infected through him because some infections can be obtained from contacts and 78% of respondents felt that using PPE is essential and it can prevent the occurrence of nosocomial infections 40% were washing hands before aseptic procedures, and the majority 80% after touching the patient environment, 60% of the respondents disposed of their medical wastes and biohazards wastes after segregation and 80% discarded there sharps in the safety box, and the least 4%in bins. <br /><strong>Conclusion</strong><br />Health workers in this study had sufficient knowledge of infection prevention prevention, but their attitudes and implementations of safe practices were substandard. The healthcare healthcare workers' practices were unsatisfactory.<br /><strong>Recommendation</strong> <br />Health workers should be trained through continuous medical education, going for further training to improve their knowledge of nosocomial infection control in health facilities</p> MAZZI JULIET BAYIYANA FLORENCE NAMUTEBI Copyright (c) 2023 MAZZI JULIET BAYIYANA , FLORENCE NAMUTEBI https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 14 14 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.813 COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF FUNCTIONAL AND RADIOLOGICAL OUTCOMES BETWEEN PROXIMAL FEMORAL NAIL ANTI-ROTATION 2 AND CONVENTIONAL PROXIMAL FEMORAL NAIL AT SCHOOL OF MEDICAL SCIENCE AND RESEARCH, SHARDA UNIVERSITY GREATER NOIDA: A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1010 <p><strong>Introduction</strong></p> <p>The PFNA (Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation) was developed to achieve improved stabilization of the femoral head and neck. The PFN (Proximal Femoral Nail) is a well-established treatment approach for proximal femoral fractures. A more recent alternative in the management of such fractures is the PFNA2 (Proximal Femoral Nail Anti-rotation 2), which incorporates a helical blade for improved bone compaction.</p> <p><strong>Aim and objectives</strong></p> <p>To evaluate the surgical and functional outcomes associated with the use of PFN and PFNA2 for the treatment of these fractures.</p> <p><strong>Material and methods</strong></p> <p>Following ethical clearance from the Ethical Committee of Sharda University, we conducted a prospective observational study involving 50 patients who were admitted to the School of Medical Science and Research, Sharda University and Medical College Greater Noida, India. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select eligible patients between Sept 2022 and Sept 2023.</p> <p><strong>Result</strong></p> <p> in the PFN group, out of the 25 study subjects 11 cases had fair modified Harris hip scores, 9 cases had good Harris hip scores, and 5 subjects had excellent modified Harris hip scores. In the PFNA2 group, out of 25 study subjects, 14 had a good modified Harris hip score, 6 had an excellent modified Harris hip score and 5 had a fair modified Harris hip score.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions</strong></p> <p>PFNA2 emerges as the preferred implant choice for elderly patients with osteoporotic bone, as it offers several advantages. Its shorter operative time is particularly beneficial for patients who may have medical comorbidities, making it a marginally superior option over PFN.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>A larger sample size with a longer follow-up period and a multicentric approach would have provided a more comprehensive assessment of the long-term outcomes of this clinical issue </p> faizan khalid Shah ujjwal sourav Copyright (c) 2024 Dr Faizan Khalid shah, Dr Ujjwal Sourav https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 7 7 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1010 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN PROJECT PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY OF FOREIGN FUNDED WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS IN JUBA CITY: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/958 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>This study aims to assess the relationship between public participation in project planning and the sustainability of foreign-funded water supply projects in Juba City.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>The study employed both quantitative and qualitative approaches to collect data. In total, a sample of 94 respondents participated in the study. Data collection methods used were questionnaires, interviews, and documentary reviews. Quantitative data was coded and entered into SPSS and analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient Qualitative data was analyzed using thematic analysis based on the research objectives.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Pearson’s correlation coefficient for public participation in project planning and sustainability of foreign-funded water Sources in Juba City was r = 0.539**, with a probability value (p = 0.000) that is less than 0 .05 level of significance showing a strong relationship between participation in planning and sustainability of foreign-funded Water Sources</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>It was concluded that public participation in project planning has a strong positive relationship with the sustainability of foreign-funded water Sources. This conclusion was based on the Pearson correlation coefficient which is at 539** with a significance level of 0.000. Therefore, if public members are involved in the planning stage such as needs identification, work plan development, and technology selection, there will be improved sustainability of foreign-funded water Sources.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>The study recommends that public members should be involved in drafting work plans to follow while carrying out foreign-funded water Source activities. This will promote community involvement and participation which will enhance ownership and sustainability of foreign-funded water Sources. </p> Lui Alex Elisa Korsuk Mohammad Ssendagi Copyright (c) 2024 Lui Alex Elisa Korsuk, Mohammed Sendagi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.958 THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMPETITIVE TENDERING METHODS AND QUALITY OF SERVICE DELIVERY IN WAKISO DISTRICT: A CORRELATIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/941 <p><strong>Background: </strong></p> <p>The study aims to assess the relationship between competitive tendering methods and the quality of service delivery in Wakiso District.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology: </strong></p> <p>This study was guided by a cross-sectional correlational research design. Triangulation of research methods was adopted in this study. 68 participants formed the sampling framework and 65 of them were determined as the sample. The sample was reached using simple random sampling techniques and purposive sampling techniques. With the quantitative data, analysis was done using frequencies, percentages, means, and Pearson correlation matrix. On the side of qualitative data, was analyzed using Content analysis.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Result: </strong></p> <p>Most of the participants were males (54%), between the ages of 40-49 years (58.8%), with an educational level of a Bachelor’s degree (58.8%), and having worked in Wakiso district user departments for 4-6years (44.1%). It was established that competitive tendering was significantly related to the quality of service delivery in Wakiso District. This is based on the Pearson value which was established at r=0.700 which was significant P=0.019. This was measured at less than 0.05 (level of significance). This meant that the higher the practice of competitive tendering, the higher the improvement in the quality of service delivery in Wakiso District. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion: </strong></p> <p>Quality of service delivery is highly determined by the proper application of competitive tendering methods in Wakiso District. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation: </strong></p> <p>National suppliers or service providers must be given a chance to undertake procurement opportunities. This can be done by ensuring that local companies that have acquired some expertise are considered without being compared to international companies.</p> Mariam Nakulima Mohammad Ssendagi Copyright (c) 2024 Mariam Nakulima, Mohammad Ssendagi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 13 13 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.941 A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY ON NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL AND AUTONOMIC OBSERVATIONS OF CASPR2-RELATED MORVAN SYNDROME. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1006 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Introduction:</span></strong></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The defining feature of Morvan syndrome is cerebral, autonomic, and peripheral hyperexcitability; this is caused by the antibody against contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2). The study aimed to examine the cognitive, autonomic, electrophysiologic, polysomnographic, and clinical spectrum of Morvan syndrome patients associated with CASPR2.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></em><em><strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Methods:</span></strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">A retrospective study was conducted. Samples of serum and CSF positive for CASPR2 antibodies for three years were evaluated. Those with Morvan syndrome, identified by clinical and electrophysiologic basis, were among them.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Results:</span></strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Among the patients with Morvan syndrome, 28 (M: F = 10:4) had an onset of 37.1 ± 17.5 years. Clinical characteristics included spastic speech (4), dysphagia (4), behavioral abnormalities (4), seizures (2), cold intolerance (2), muscular twitching (24), sleeplessness (24), pain (22), paresthesias (18), hyperhidrosis (14), hypersalivation (12), double incontinence (6). Myokymia (24), hyperactive tendon reflexes (20), and tremor (12) were found during the neurologic examination. Neuromyotonia (24) and higher spontaneous activity (14) were seen on the EMG. Six cases of insomnia, two cases of absentee deep sleep, two instances of high-frequency beta activity, one point of REM behavior disorder, and one case of periodic leg movements were found in the polysomnography results of twelve patients.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Neuropsychological testing showed slight temporal and left frontal involvement. No cancers were identified during the workup. Each patient received steroids. Ten neuropathic pain patients had complete neurologic remission at follow-up.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></em><em><strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Conclusion:</span></strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">This work has advanced the understanding of Morvan syndrome linked to CASPR2. It is critical for greater awareness and early detection because immunotherapy may be able to treat it.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></em><em><strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Recommendation:</span></strong><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Regularly get evaluated for the majority of common investigations, including brain MRIs, EEGs, PET scans, and CSF analyses. Individuals who should undergo regular evaluations are those presenting characteristic symptoms such as spastic speech, dysphagia, behavioral abnormalities, seizures, and neuromuscular issues.</span></p> Rashmi Singh Nikhil Kumar Copyright (c) 2024 Rashmi Singh, Nikhil Kumar https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 6 6 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1006 A CROSS-SECTIONAL OBSERVATIONAL STUDY ON RURAL INSIGHTS: MATERNAL BODY METRICS, PRE-PREGNANCY BODY MASS INDEX, AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1027 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>Understanding the association between maternal health and fetal development is crucial, especially in rural settings where healthcare and nutritional resources are often limited. This study explores the impact of maternal anthropometric measurements and pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index (BMI) on fetal growth parameters, focusing on a rural population to highlight unique challenges and patterns that might differ from urban experiences.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study was conducted with 240 pregnant women in their first trimester. Comprehensive sociodemographic and anthropometric data were collected, and the study focused on maternal pre-pregnancy weight, height, and BMI as primary variables. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The study found no instances of macrosomia but noted a significant number of low birth weight (LBW) babies. Significant differences were observed in the mean pre-pregnancy weight and BMI (18.95 ± 1.75 kg/m² vs. 19.85 ± 2.80 kg/m², p=0.003) between the LBW and normal birth weight groups, indicating that lower maternal weight and BMI before pregnancy are related with a greater risk of LBW. Established correlations between maternal pre-pregnancy weight/BMI and neonatal metrics, along with sociodemographic data, highlighted the significant impact of low education and income levels on LBW risk, emphasizing socioeconomic factors' importance in maternal and fetal health.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The study confirms the significant impact of maternal anthropometric measurements on neonatal outcomes, particularly in a rural context. It emphasizes the need for comprehensive maternal healthcare services focusing on nutrition and education to improve fetal growth outcomes.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations:</strong></p> <p>Policies and healthcare strategies should be tailored to meet the needs of rural populations, ensuring better maternal and child health. Future research should incorporate detailed dietary and health behavior data to elucidate the pathways linking maternal health to fetal outcomes and explore the impact of interventions targeting maternal nutrition and healthcare access.</p> Chandra Kiran Nimisha Madhu Copyright (c) 2024 Chandra Kiran, Nimisha Madhu https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 6 6 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1027 PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS AND IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA, IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL, ODISHA: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1022 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Background:</span></strong></em><strong><em><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Tuberculosis is a pulmonary infection that is a global health concern it affects a wide range of people worldwide. This infectious disease is contagious and spreads through droplets in the air. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></strong></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Methods:</span></strong></em><span lang="EN-IN" style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">52 patients participated in this study 19 among them female and 33 were males. The study was conducted O.P.D. and I.P.D. in the P.G. department of Pulmonary, Hitech Medical College and Hospital, Bhubaneswar. In the period of 7 months from January 2023 to July 2023. This was a cross-sectional study in a hospital setting. The participants were analyzed for tuberculosis and hematological parameters. The data obtained was statistically analyzed and the correlation was determined.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><span lang="EN-IN" style="color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Results:</span></strong></em><strong><em><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Female patients' ages ranged from 21 to 64, averaging 31 years, while males were 28 to 85 years old, averaging 52. Approximately 45% had +1 sputum microscopy results. Significant associations with tuberculosis diagnosis were found in hemoglobin levels, leukocyte count, serum ferritin, iron levels, CRP, and total iron-binding capacity (p &lt; 0.01). Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts peaked at 70 and 28, respectively. The study showed increased ferritin and CRP levels, indicating inflammation and infection, and a notable anemia prevalence, underscoring the need for an integrated treatment approach.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></strong></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Conclusion:</span></strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The study reveals elevated ferritin and CRP levels, alongside a significant prevalence of anemia in tuberculosis patients, highlighting the disease's systemic impact. These findings advocate for incorporating hematological parameters in tuberculosis diagnostics, underlining the need for integrated treatment approaches to enhance patient care and outcomes.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><span lang="EN-IN" style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Recommendation:</span></strong></em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Anaemia is often associated with pulmonary tuberculosis. Iron supplementation can help in the management of tuberculosis with anemia. </span></p> Debaranjan Das Srinibas Sahoo Yera Dhanurdhar Sarat ku. Behera Surjya Shankar Meher Copyright (c) 2024 Debaranjan Das, Srinibas Sahoo, Yera Dhanurdhar, Sarat ku. Behera , Surjya Shankar Meher https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 7 7 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1022 THE INFLUENCE OF AFRICAN ORAL ART FORMS IN RAISING CLIMATE CHANGE AWARENESS IN OLIVER MTUKUDZI’S ‘PINDIRAI’. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1004 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>The need for different stakeholders, particularly in developing nations, to promote climate change awareness has been emphasized by scholars and environmental activists. Yet, musicians appear to be overlooked in these calls despite their influence in society. The article presents an analysis of “Pindirai”, a song that was composed and sung by the legendary Zimbabwean musician, Oliver Mtukudzi, to show how it presents the effects of anthropogenic climate change through traditional African oral art forms. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methods: </strong></p> <p>Afrocentricity served as a theoretical lens through which we examined ‘Pindirai’ because it rejected the claim that Europe is the origin of knowledge which was perpetuated by Europe’s global dominance for many years. In addition, critical discourse analysis (CDA), a qualitative means of gathering data, was used to examine words’ frequency, usage, and implications in the song under study. CDA enabled the study to infer meanings and motivation behind the way messages are encoded which facilitated interpretations based on the context.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>It was observed that, through thought-provoking rhetorical devices such as invocation, rhetorical figures, proverbs, and symbolism among others, Mtukudzi departs from the victimhood narrative by giving agency to Africans whom the singer calls on to revert to their traditions which serve as a manual for life. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusions:</strong></p> <p>Mtukudzi is successful in urging Africans, using their language, to own up for their part in causing climate change by preserving natural resources. Much as scientists have flagged human activities in Western countries as the main cause of climate change, Mtukudzi is commended for urging Africans to act responsibly.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations:</strong></p> <p>African governments need to provide resources to communicate climate-related initiatives and facilitate the participation of indigenous people in endeavors that seek to sustain livelihoods in the face of adverse effects of climate change.</p> Witness Roya Sandiso Ngcobo Copyright (c) 2024 Witness, Sandiso Ngcobo https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1004 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETES AMONG ADULTS AGED 45 TO 60 YEARS AT ORUM HEALTH CENTER IV, OTUKE DISTRICT. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/929 <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Background </strong></p> <p>Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by the presence of elevated levels of blood glucose which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Purpose</strong> </p> <p>Determined the prevalence, knowledge, and health facility-related factors associated with diabetes among adults aged 45 to 60 years at Orum Health Center 1V, Otuke district</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed where 67 respondents were obtained by simple random sampling method. Data was collected by face-to-face interview using a questionnaire.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p> prevalence of diabetes was 28(33%) among the respondents, 61(91%) had heard about diabetes and knew something about diabetes, 06(9.0%) were not sure, majority 34(50.8%) reported obesity as a major risk factor whereas few 05(7.5%) reported smoking with most 23(34.3%) reporting excessive thirst as symptom, least 04(6.0%) stated numbness, majority of respondents 34(50.8%) would take more than thirty-one minutes to reach the facility while few 07(10.4%) would take between 1-10 minutes 36(54%) reported health workers attitude was good, 04(6%) reported bad attitude towards diabetic patients, with transport 31(46.3%) most hindrance to the facility, whereas the least 07(10.4%) reported health workers absence, most respondents 24(36%) would wait 30 minutes to 2 hours whereas few would wait for less than 30 minutes before attended to. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p> Prevalence of diabetes was high with a high number of respondents between 56-60 years, the knowledge of respondents about diabetes was good because the majority had heard and knew about diabetes, and health workers' attitude towards diabetic patients was good because most of them were willing to help the patients.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>Government through the Ministry of Health should avail more resources for screening diabetes, carry out public awareness campaigns, train health personnel, and other measures that improve service delivery and the burden of disease in the nation.</p> <p> </p> SOLOMON OMACH OTIENO JOASH ODIWUOR Copyright (c) 2024 SOLOMON OMACH , MR. OTIENO JOASH ODIWUOR https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 9 9 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.929 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES TOWARDS PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING AMONG MEN AGED 40-60 YEARS ATTENDING KISENYI HEALTH CENTRE IV, KAMPALA. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/821 <p style="margin: 0cm;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma',sans-serif; color: #0e101a;">Background:</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Purpose of the study</span></strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">: The purpose of the study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward prostate cancer screening among men aged 40-60 years attending Kisenyi Health Centre IV, in Kampala.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Objectives:</span></strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> The objectives of the study were to determine the knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards prostate cancer screening among men aged 40-60 years attending Kisenyi Health Centre IV, Kampala, whereas the specific objectives were to, determine the knowledge, assess the attitudes, and determine the practices of men aged 40-60 years towards prostate cancer screening.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma',sans-serif; color: #0e101a;">Methodology:</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional study design. it facilitated the collection of adequate data despite the limited time frame that was allocated as well as the limited resources that were available for the study.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma',sans-serif; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma',sans-serif; color: #0e101a;">Results: </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Study findings revealed that the majority 90% were urban residents and 10% were rural residents,72 (62%) respondents were between (40-49) years and 44(38%) were between (50-60) years,111(96%) respondents were married and 5(4%) were divorced. 114(98%) had good knowledge, 106(91%) had positive attitudes and 95(82%) had never been screened for prostate cancer.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma',sans-serif; color: #0e101a;">Conclusion:</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">From the findings majority of the respondents had sufficient knowledge about prostate cancer and positive attitudes toward prostate cancer screening practices however screening practices were still very poor.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma',sans-serif; color: #0e101a;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma',sans-serif; color: #0e101a;">Recommendations: </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">With support, and funding from the Government of Uganda and the non-government organizations through the Ministry of Health, I recommend that more prostate cancer screening departments be established on a health Centre level, services provided should be free of charge, prostate cancer screening messages should be broadcasted in all languages to the public</span><span style="color: #0e101a;">.</span></p> JOSHUA KAMWESIGE Joash Odiwuor Otieno Copyright (c) 2024 Joshua Kamwesige, Joash Odiwuor Otieno https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.821 AN ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFICACY OF SELECTIVE LASER TRABECULOPLASTY (SLT) IN OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA PATIENTS: A CLINICAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1002 <p><em><strong>Introduction:</strong></em></p> <p><em>Objectives:</em> The present study aims to assess the efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) when used as the first-line or supplementary therapy for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients.</p> <p><em> </em><em><strong>Methods:</strong></em><strong><em> </em></strong></p> <p>In this study conducted over one year, 1820 patients visited the Regional Institute of Ophthalmology (RIO), IGIMS, Patna, Bihar, India for SLT, averaging about 35 patients per week. The sample was bifurcated into two groups: Group A (944 patients, 1888 eyes) received SLT in addition to their existing anti-glaucomatous medications (AGM), while Group B (876 patients, 1752 eyes) comprised newly diagnosed POAG patients, for whom SLT served as the primary treatment.</p> <p><em> </em><em><strong>Results:</strong></em><strong><em> </em></strong></p> <p>In this study, the overall cohort displayed an average baseline intraocular pressure of 21.3 ± 4.8 mm of Hg, which decreased to 15.5 ± 2.6 mm Hg post-SLT. The pressure reduction was 33.5 % in Group A and 41.5 % in Group B. In some cases, when treatment with SLT alone could not give the desired intraocular pressure, both groups turned to initiating or increasing AGM. Notably, 51.3% belonging to the first group and 64.3% belonging to the second group achieved target intraocular pressure with SLT alone, and after SLT, 71.5% of first group patients and 65.3% of second group patients no longer required glaucoma medication at the last visit.</p> <p><em> </em><em><strong>Conclusion:</strong></em><strong><em> </em></strong></p> <p>SLT proves effective as both a primary and additional therapy for open-angle glaucoma, significantly reducing medicine usage. The IOP reduction remains consistent in both primary and adjunctive treatment groups during a year of follow-up.</p> <p><em> </em><em><strong>Recommendation:</strong></em> </p> <p>Based on the results, it is recommended to integrate SLT into glaucoma treatment protocols, exploring its potential to reduce medication reliance, and promoting extended research for a more comprehensive assessment of SLT's long-term benefits.</p> Manish Kumar Karn Madhulika Sinha Yugesh Copyright (c) 2024 Manish Kumar Karn, Madhulika Sinha, Yugesh https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 7 7 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1002 A CLINICAL-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY ON BLUNT OCULAR TRAUMA AND ITS VISUAL OUTCOME IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL OF EASTERN INDIA. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1021 <p><strong>Background:</strong><em> </em> </p> <p>Injury in the ocular region accidental or intended leads to ocular morbidity that accounts for poor visual prognosis and loss of quality of life, if not diagnosed and managed at the earliest.<em> </em>The study aims to observe clinical-epidemiological aspects of blunt ocular trauma and to determine the visual capacity.</p> <p><em> </em><strong>Methodology:</strong><em> </em></p> <p>An observational study was conducted. Patients with blunt ocular trauma at tertiary care hospitals were undertaken for the study. Relevant history with demographic data was noted. A detailed clinical and thorough ocular examination was done. Patients were managed with medical or surgical methods and follow-up was taken for the next six months.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> </p> <p>Blunt ocular trauma, found in 0.24% of cases, primarily affected males aged 21 to 30 years, often laborers, agricultural workers, or rural residents. Sticks and fists were the main causes, with the right eye and anterior segment frequently affected. Traumatic glaucoma and hypotony occurred in 66% and 34% of cases, respectively, with most managed medically (67%). Refractive errors affected 36 patients, predominantly myopic (75%). Initially, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was commonly 6/60-6/18 (33.2%), improving at 6 months to 6/18-6/6 (49.5%). Common B-scan findings included vitreous hemorrhage (32%), traumatic cataract (19%), lens subluxation (13%), posterior vitreous detachment (9%), retinal detachment (8%), and lens dislocation (7%).</p> <p><em> </em><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Ocular injuries lead to multiple complications; they cannot be examined accurately by routine methods. B-scan ultrasonography is recommended while investigating these injuries this aids in the preparation of the surgery with an accurate understanding of the injury. </p> <p><strong>Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>Educating people, and creating awareness to adopt protective measures in the workplace can prevent the occurrence of blunt ocular trauma, and at the same time rapid diagnosis, early referral, accurate investigations, and appropriate management can prevent complications following trauma.</p> <p> </p> Shrutakirty Parida Snehalata Dash Saswati Sen Copyright (c) 2024 Shrutakirty Parida, Snehalata Dash, Saswati Sen https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 9 9 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1021 COMPARISON OF STOOL ANTIGEN TEST OVER UREA BREATH TEST IN DETECTION OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING NSAMBYA HOSPITAL IN KAMPALA DISTRICT.A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/907 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>H. pylori infection rates are higher in resource-poor settings and developing -countries such as Uganda. Even though most health facilities in Uganda including government health facilities have put in place several measures including diagnostic methods for H. pylori, there is still a rise in the prevalence of H. pylori infection.</p> <p><strong>Aim</strong></p> <p>The study aimed to compare stool antigen test over urea breath test in detecting helicobacter pylori infection among patients attending Nsambya Hospital in Kampala district.</p> <p><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>The study employed a cross-sectional design and a questionnaire guide to gather information from 375 individuals at the Outpatient department at Nsambya Hospital in Kampala district. These were selected using simple random sampling. </p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The study results indicate that the prevalence of <em>H. pylori</em> was 48.0% by UBT and that of SAT was 46.9%, with most of the positive cases being in females 30.4% for UBT and 29.6% for SAT. On comparing SAT with UBT, SAT had a sensitivity of 97.8% and a specificity of 99.5%.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>In this study, UBT performance showed a slightly higher prevalence of detecting H. pylori infection compared to SAT thus UBT remains the gold standard method in diagnosing<em> H. pylori</em> <em>infection</em>. In addition, UBT also detects <em>H. pylori</em> bacteria in low parasitemia.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>The SAT, which detects present but not previous infection of <em>H. pylori</em> would be applicable in mass survey.UBT should be done for every patient suspected of having<em> H. pylori</em> <em>infection</em> with negative SAT in order not to miss out on people with the disease as it remains the gold standard for <em>H. </em>P diagnosis. The Health authorities and other stakeholders should encourage using UBT on all patients suspected of having H. pylori infection.<strong> </strong></p> JANE NANYUNJA Anthony ssekitoleko Copyright (c) 2024 Jane Nanyunja, Anthony ssekitoleko https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.907 PLANNING AS A MANAGEMENT FUNCTION AND THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THEMATIC CURRICULUM (ITC) IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS IN DABANI SUB-COUNTY IN BUSIA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1018 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>The study investigated how planning as a management function affects the implementation of the Thematic</p> <p>Curriculum (ITC) in P/S in Dabani Sub-County, Busia District.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology: </strong></p> <p>The study randomly sampled a population of one hundred and eighty (180) people to form a sample size of one hundred and twenty-three (123) respondents.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>89 (74.2%) of the respondents were male and 31 (25.8%) were female which implies that there were more male teachers than female. There is a strong positive correlation between planning (providing more learning materials) and implementation of a Thematic Curriculum (doing exercises on a blackboard). This can be seen clearly from the correlation significance at 0.01 levels of 0.34 (r=0.34, p&lt;0.01) This means that planning affected the implementation of a thematic curriculum, especially in the provision of teaching and learning materials.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The major conclusion of the study was that planning as a management function affected ITC.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation: </strong> </p> <p>The recommendations were that the Ministry of Education and Sports in collaboration with District Education Officials should carry out more studies on; the recruitment and deployment of teachers in schools, the teachers' preparations, the teaching and learning process, and then factors that affect the setting of the minimum performance standard and making corrections from deviations in the ITC.</p> Mohammad Sendagi Joyce Nafula Copyright (c) 2024 Mohammad Sendagi , Joyce Nafula https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 15 15 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1018 INFLUENCE OF TEACHER FACTORS ON ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN UCE UNDER USE SCHOOLS IN YUMBE TOWN COUNCIL, YUMBE DISTRICT; A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/939 <p> </p> <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>This study aims to find out the influence of Teacher factors on academic performance in UCE under USE schools in Yumbe town council, Yumbe District.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional survey design based on qualitative and quantitative approaches was used to get the findings. The target population comprised of 121, head teachers, teachers, students, student leaders, district education officers, Board of governor members, and community leaders were randomly and purposively sampled. The methods of data collection included: a questionnaire survey, interview, observation, and documentary review. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were used and the data was presented using frequency tables and correlation matrices.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The major findings were that: the majority (82%) of the teachers were well-trained and qualified, and most (62%) teachers were not well motivated by their stakeholders. Most (76%) teachers gave students ample time to practice/exercise and kept good records of their progress as shown by the 92% response rate. The teacher-student relationship was fairly good and most (54%) teachers were always present at school. Most (74% and 62%) teachers had positive attitudes towards their work and were adequately prepared before teaching.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The findings made the researcher conclude that teacher factors are very important in influencing academic performance in secondary schools in Yumbe town council, Yumbe district. </p> <p>However, the teachers needed to be fully motivated more by the stakeholders in the form of good pay, improving working conditions, and their welfare among others if better academic performance was to be achieved in the USE schools in Yumbe town council, Yumbe district.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations:</strong></p> <p>The Government of Uganda and school administrators should improve on the welfare of teachers in terms of pay, and decent accommodation if they are to be motivated to work hard towards better academic performance.</p> Khamis Abdallah Zubair Mohammad Ssendagi Copyright (c) 2024 Khamis Abdallah Zubair, Mohammad Ssendagi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 12 12 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.939 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICE REGARDING OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICINE AND SELF-MEDICATION AMONG STUDENTS AT MEDICARE HEALTH PROFESSIONALS COLLEGE. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/817 <p><strong>Study objectives:</strong> </p> <p>The general objective of this study was to assess the Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of self-medication and over-the-counter medicine use while the specific objectives were to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice self-medication and use of over-the-counter medications among students of Medicare health Professionals College.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> </p> <p>A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with data collected from 115 respondents selected by simple random sampling using printed self-administered questionnaires. The data was then analyzed using Microsoft Excel version 2010 and presented in tables, pie charts, and graphs.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> </p> <p>Out of 115 respondents, 99(86%) knew that the use of medicines with unknown substances was dangerous to people with liver and kidney diseases, and 58(50%) of them got information from the internet and social media. About 113(98%) thought that self-medication was part of self-care, 82(71%) thought self-medication was acceptable, 94(82%) had practiced self-medication only once in the past 3 months, 40(35%) practiced self-medication because they had a headache, 10(45%) adjusted the dose because of not getting better.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> </p> <p>The majority of the students had considerable knowledge concerning self-medication and the majority had self-treated themselves for mild health conditions. The internet and social media were the most used sources of information among the students. However, their attitude about the safety and effectiveness of self-medication and over-the-counter medicines is not satisfactory. </p> <p><strong>Recommendations: </strong></p> <p>The government and other concerned stakeholders should have a more intense sensitization of the general population about mindset change and advice on how to safely practice self-medication. Health promotion and sensitization campaigns should also be channeled to the internet and social media since is the audience mostly used by youths in the country.</p> MOUREEN INGABIRE LYDIA ANYWAR Copyright (c) 2024 Moureen Ingabire, Lydia Anywar https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 11 11 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.817 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS AGED 10-25 YEARS ATTENDING MAKONGE HEALTH CENTRE III, BUIKWE DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/814 <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;">Background.</span></strong></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;">H.pylori is a flagellated gram-negative, microaerophilic, helical bacterium about 3.5 μm long, its infections are most often contracted in childhood and are known to cause Peptic ulcer.</span></span> <span class="s1"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;">To determine the prevalence, Socio-demographic factors, and knowledge about Helicobacter Pylori infection among patients aged 10-25 years attending Makonge Health Centre III, Buikwe district.</span></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;">Methodology</span></strong></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;">A cross-sectional study with a simple random sampling technique was used and data was collected using a standard semi-structured questionnaire analyzed using descriptive frequencies, and percentages using Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Word and presented in tables and pie charts.</span></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;">Results</span></strong></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;">From the results, majority, 64(67%) of the respondents tested negative, the majority of the respondents were both 10-17 years and 18-25years were 29(78%) and 35(59%) H.pylori negative respectively, and the majority of both males and females tested H.pylori negative with 33(70%) and 31(53%) respectively and majority 78(81%) of the respondents had ever heard about H.pylori with low knowledge on causes, prevention, signs, and symptoms</span></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;">Conclusions</span></strong></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;">From the results, majority of respondents tested negative and the minority tested positive hence low prevalence, the ages 10 to 17 and ages 18 to 25 tested negative and the majority were female, married, and urban residents and had at least attained primary school education and the majority were not taking alcohol. Therefore, higher socio-demographic status was a high predictor of H. pylori infection. In the study to assess levels of knowledge among the respondents, the majority had ever heard and the minority had never heard about H.pylori infection and the majority did not know the cause, preventive measures, signs, and symptoms. </span></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;"> <br /></span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span><span class="s1"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;">Recommendations.</span></strong></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></strong></span></p> <p class="p1" style="margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify; text-justify: inter-ideograph;"><span class="s1"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;">MOH should sensitize the community to test for H.pylori whenever they get signs of ulcers and conduct mass screening by the facility and health workers health educate the community about causes, Signs, symptoms, and preventive measures of H.pylori infection.</span></span><span class="apple-converted-space"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; color: windowtext;"> </span></span></p> JOHN MAGUDO LYDIA ANYWAR OYELLA Copyright (c) 2024 JOHN MAGUDO, LYDIA ANYWAR OYELLA https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.814 EFFECT OF MONITORING AND EVALUATION IMPLEMENTATION ON THE PERFORMANCE OF UNIVERSAL SECONDARY EDUCATION SCHOOLS IN KINYAMASEKE TOWN COUNCIL, KASESE DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1017 <p><strong>Background: </strong></p> <p>The study investigated the effect of Monitoring and Evaluation implementation on the performance of Universal Secondary Education schools in Kinyamaseke Town Council, Kasese District</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>The study employed a descriptive research design and the main data collection instruments were questionnaires and interviews. The study findings were aimed at answering the study objectives whose details have been presented concerning 64 respondents. SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Scientists) was used as well.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>The majority of the respondents were male 67% (43) as compared to female respondents33% (21) and most of them were within the age group 45% (31-50). Findings revealed a significant moderate positive correlation (rho= .495) between M&amp;E implementation and performance of USE schools whereby better M&amp;E implementation was related to better performance of USE schools and poor M&amp;E implementation was related to poor performance of USE schools. M&amp;E implementation accounted for a 24.5% variance in the performance of USE schools. Both M&amp;E information gathering and M&amp;E accountability had a significant effect on the performance of USE schools. However, M&amp;E information gathering had a greater effect on the performance of USE schools compared to that of M&amp;E accountability.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong></p> <p>The study demonstrates the importance of M&amp;E implementation in the performance of schools. The positive relationship between M&amp;E implementation in organizational performance emphasizes that school activities should be performed well for the schools to run well.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>Ministry of Education and Sports should put in place a mechanism to keep stakeholders informed of USE M&amp;E activities, periodically publish its USE M&amp;E annual financial report, and have clear informative USE M&amp;E reports.</p> SULAIT MASEREKA Mohammed Sendagi Copyright (c) 2024 SULAIT MASEREKA , Mohammed Sendagi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 11 11 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1017 A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON AXILLARY CONTRACTURE FOLLOWING BURNS AT PATNA MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL, BIHAR, INDIA. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1005 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Background and Aim:</span></strong></em><em><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Post-burn contracture (PBC) of the axilla, stemming from burn injuries affecting the armpit region, poses a significant challenge in terms of both function and aesthetics. This study delves into the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management strategies for this debilitating condition, aiming to comprehensively address the challenges faced by patients and healthcare professionals.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></strong></em><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Methodology: </span></strong></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">A prospective study was conducted at the Department of Plastic Surgery at Patna Medical College and Hospital in Patna, Bihar, India involving 40 patients experiencing PBC of the axilla. Inclusion criteria comprised patients who expressed a willingness to undergo surgical management, while exclusion criteria ruled out individuals with axillary contractures occurring within 12 months of their burns.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></strong></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Results: </span></strong></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The study cohort, ranging from 8 to 47 years, revealed a predominance of flame burns (65%), with the right axilla being more commonly affected (45%). Clinical manifestations included a restricted range of motion and deformities, emphasizing the multifaceted impact of contractures. Surgical interventions varied, with 50% undergoing contracture release and split-thickness skin grafting. The preoperative range of shoulder abduction varied between 30° and 100°, with an average of 96°.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></strong></em><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Conclusion: </span></strong></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Reconstructive surgery faces an intricate challenge when dealing with PBC of the axilla, requiring tailored approaches for each case. As research progresses, individualized patient care and targeted preventive measures will play pivotal roles in enhancing outcomes and mitigating the impact of this debilitating condition arising from burn injuries.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a; font-style: normal;"> </span></strong></em><em><strong><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Recommendation:</span></strong></em><em><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></em></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span lang="EN-IN" style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">To properly treat axillary burn contracture, multicenter studies should be carried out for improved generalizability; sample sizes should be increased for increased statistical power; prospective data collection should be used to reduce recall bias; and long-term follow-ups should be carried out to thoroughly evaluate the sustainability and possible complications of surgical interventions.</span></p> Sanjay Kumar Gupta Venkata Ravi Kishore Raghavendra Singh Shinde Sagar Sambhaji Copyright (c) 2024 Sanjay Kumar Gupta, Venkata Ravi Kishore, Raghavendra Singh, Shinde Sagar Sambhaji https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 8 8 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1005 SUCCESSFUL SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR RUPTURE OF AN EXTERNAL ILIAC ARTERY PSEUDO ANEURYSM INTO A URETER: A CASE REPORT. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/999 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Background: </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Gross hematuria can indicate various urological conditions, including nephrolithiasis, malignancies, infections, and trauma. While most cases are manageable and not life-threatening, certain rare conditions like pseudo-uretero-iliac artery fistula (UIAF) are emergent and potentially fatal, requiring prompt multidisciplinary intervention for diagnosis and treatment.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Case: </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">This paper presents a unique case of a ruptured pseudo-iliac aneurysm in the ureter. The patient's clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and treatment approach, encompassing angiography, cystoscopy, CT imaging, and possibly surgical exploration, are discussed to highlight the complexity and urgency of managing such cases.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Conclusion: </span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Pseudo-UIAF represents a critical emergency with varied clinical manifestations from asymptomatic to severe shock. The successful management of this case underscores the importance of a comprehensive diagnostic strategy and a multidisciplinary approach to treatment. Further discussion on the causes, risk factors, and pathophysiology of pseudo-UIAF, along with a review of diagnosis and treatment modalities, enriches our understanding and management of such rare but lethal emergencies.</span></p> Kumar Bhartendu Dharmendra Prasad Kumar Rahul Nathani Sidharth Krishna Rajiv Copyright (c) 2024 Kumar Bhartendu, Dharmendra Prasad, Kumar Rahul, Nathani Sidharth, Krishna Rajiv https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.999 FOOD CHAIN SYSTEM AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF INMATES IN UGANDA: A CASE STUDY OF OLIA GOVERNMENT PRISON, ADJUMANI DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/934 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>This study analyzed the effectiveness and efficiency of the prison food chain system, determined the nutritional adequacy of the prison food, and the nutritional status of the inmates in Olia government, Adjumani district, Uganda.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Method:</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study design was used in an average 200-bed capacity of Olia government prison. Multiple methods were used to assess food available at the group and individual levels, including verification of food portion size through food plate measurements, and quality. Food portion size measurement was done for all the 199 eligible prisoners, 179 measurements were conducted for weight and height, 2 key informant interviews were conducted, and 1 FGD with the prisoners was conducted.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Result:</strong></p> <p> Planned prison food ration to be nutritionally adequate in terms of energy (Kcal), but low in quality. The micronutrient content of the ration was low in minerals and vitamins, especially minerals like calcium and iron, and vitamin A, vitamin B5, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, and deficient in vitamin B12. The ICRC dietary targets for inmates were not achieved. The prevalence of malnutrition (overweight and underweight) among the inmates was at a serious level, 10.6%. No cases of severe wasting and obesity were identified.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion: </strong></p> <p>The inmate population is at a greater risk of developing a triple burden of malnutrition due to the presence of overweight, underweight, and micronutrient deficiencies cases in the prison. Food intake to be nutritionally adequate in terms of caloric requirement but of inadequate quality. The food chain system works well, with energy change from one from preparation to distribution phase along the food chain being below the acceptable limit of 5% from the day’s ration.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations:</strong></p> <p>More efforts are needed to improve the food storage and preparation facility, local production of fruits, vegetables, small ruminants, and documentation of food stocks.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> Edward Dramwi Gordon Kibirige Jane Frank Nalubega Copyright (c) 2024 Edward DRAMWI, Gordon KIBIRIGE, Jane Frank Nalubega https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 16 16 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.934 PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS OF MALNUTRITION AMONG ELDERLY AGED 60 YEARS AND ABOVE AT OPD KIBOGA GENERAL HOSPITAL IN KIBOGA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/848 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p> Malnutrition refers to a state of either undernutrition or overnutrition. Undernutrition occurs when the diet a person consumes does not meet their body's requirements for growth and development while overnutrition occurs when they consume too many calories. Undernutrition may manifest as low body weight for age.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study was used to investigate factors influencing the nutritional status of the elderly aged 60 years and above in Kiboga General Hospital, Kiboga district. The researcher used this study design to collect both quantitative and qualitative data within a short period to explain the relationship between factors influencing the nutritional status of elderly patients, functional ability, and consequences of malnutrition in the elderly.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The prevalence of undernourished was 47.9% based on mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC). There was a significant difference between the prevalence of malnutrition by sex; 71.9% of women were undernourished (average MUAC=20.0cm) compared to 28.1% of men. Those who had adequate knowledge regarding malnutrition had a higher education level. 80.7% of the malnourished elderly had a low-income level (poor) thus they were unable to have 3 meals or more meals each day or to buy food supplements.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>This study found out that almost half of the elderly participants were malnourished, with females being highly malnourished than men, majority of the elderly had adequate knowledge about malnutrition due to continuous health education given in the hospital. Furthermore, the study revealed that most of the elderly were poor this in turn affected the frequency, quantity, and quality of food they fed on.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p> The elderly need to be incorporated into health programs and policies based at local government levels as is the case with pregnant and under five (5) children.</p> ENOCK SSEBAMBULIDDE JUSTINE NEGESA Copyright (c) 2024 ENOCK SSEBAMBULIDDE, JUSTINE NEGESA https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.848 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH MALNUTRITION AMONG CHILDREN AGED BELOW 5 YEARS AT KINONI HEALTH CENTRE IV, RWAMPARA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY . https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/905 <p><strong>Background.</strong></p> <p>Malnutrition refers to deficiencies excesses or imbalances in a person’s intake of energy and low nutrients.</p> <p><strong>Study objective</strong></p> <p>The specific objectives were to assess the knowledge of caretakers on malnutrition among children, to examine the social demographic factors, and to determine the economic factors associated with malnutrition among children below 5 years at Kinoni Health Center IV, Rwampara district.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study of 62 respondents was used for the study. The questionnaires were used to collect data and were analyzed using a tally, the data collected was also analyzed using tables and pie charts.</p> <p><strong>Results </strong></p> <p>The majority of respondents were females, residing in rural areas by 72%. Most of them believed that malnutrition was common between the ages of 4 and 5 years. Moreover, they knew that deworming prevents malnutrition. 34.5% had poor knowledge of when to breastfeed the child and 19.4% on the importance of colostrum to the newborn. Only a few 10% stated that they started their supplementary feeds for children before 6 months, while most claimed that nutrients in breast milk alone are no longer adequate for proper child growth. 48.4% replied that poverty leads to inadequate dietary intake, infections, poor hygienic habits, and low education. Many believe that unnecessary high food prices as the highest risk of malnutrition</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusions.</strong></p> <p>Many of the respondents’ children had good knowledge about malnutrition. The majority were agriculturalists living in rural areas. Most were from poor families where men made decisions on family income expenditure.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>Therefore, the study recommends that health workers continuously health educate the caretakers on how to prevent malnutrition, the requirements to make therapeutic food, how to treat malnutrition in children, and how to feed children under five when they get malnutrition.</p> JONAN BYAMUKAMA JUSTINE NEGESA Copyright (c) 2024 Jonan Byamukama, Negesa Justine https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.905 FACTORS INFLUENCING THE NUTRITION STATUS OF CHILDREN UNDER 5 YEARS AT THE NUTRITION AND PEADIATRIC WARD IN IGANGA HOSPITAL. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/858 <p><strong>Introduction:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Objectives of the study:</strong>to assess the factors influencing nutrition status among children under 5 years at the nutrition and paediatric wards in Iganga General Hospital.</p> <p>The specific objectives were to assess the level of knowledge of caregivers of children, to assess the practices of caregivers of children and to find out the maternal factors; influencing nutrition status among children under 5 years at the nutrition and paediatric wards in Iganga General Hospital.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong>A cross sectional descriptive study design was used, using both qualitative and quantitative approaches at the nutrition and paediatric wards in Iganga General Hospital. The researcher conveniently sampled on 100 respondents from 6<sup>th</sup> January 2023 to 25<sup>th</sup> January 2023. Data collection was by using self-administered questionnaires which were filled and later analyzed using tables, graphs and pie charts.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Out of the 100 respondents. Majority; 89(89%) knew the importance of exclusive breastfeeding to the children for at least 6 months. Majority; 79(79%) practiced appropriate complimentary feeding while 21(21%) did not. Majority; maternal factors like age and education levels had some effect on the factors that influence on the nutrition status of the under 5years children in Iganga general hospital.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The study showed that despite the caretakers having knowledge of exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding of the children, a number of them adhere not to the practices and application of the knowledge and this was affiliated to the limited resources to do so. The study further identified that maternal age, marital status, education level and occupation had a significant influence on the nutrition status of the children under 5 years.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong>: There is need for the caretakers to adhere to the practices and knowledge acquired in order to effect results concerning the improvement of the nutrition status of children</p> EMMANUEL ORUMI FLORENCE NAMUTEBI Copyright (c) 2024 EMMANUEL ORUMI , FLORENCE NAMUTEBI https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 13 13 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.858 SPECIFIC CORRELATED FACTORS TO UNDERNUTRITION AMONG CHILDREN 0-59 MONTHS IN MUBENDE DISTRICT: A CASE STUDY OF MUBENDE REGIONAL REFERRAL HOSPITAL, CENTRAL UGANDA. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/963 <p><strong>Background</strong>:</p> <p>Malnutrition is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity among children 0-59 months of age not only in Uganda but worldwide. To understand the causes of malnutrition among children who are 0-59 months of age, a study was conducted in Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, Mubende district in the south-central region of Uganda to find out the specific correlated factors responsible for undernutrition children of this age category.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong>:</p> <p>The data was collected from MMRH by use of a structured questionnaire that involved Child anthropometry, Child-related factors, maternal-related factors, and male involvement. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis of data was done in MS Excel, Epi Info program-nutrition module, and Stata statistical software.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong>:</p> <p>It was found out that caretaker (P=0.03, 0.01, 0.00), age at which the mother got first born (P=0.00, 0.00, 0.02), maternal occupation (P=0.02, 0.00, 0.01), and maternal education level (P=0.03, 0.02, 0.01) were the major factors influencing on undernutrition (wasting, stunting and underweight) respectively. The study also noted that male involvement in activities to address childhood undernutrition was mainly in purchasing food while other activities were not paid much attention to.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <p>The study identifies that caretaker, age at which the mother got first born, maternal occupation, and maternal education level were the major factors influencing undernutrition in children 0-59 months of age in Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, Mubende district.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong>:</p> <p>The study recommends the government strengthen its poverty alleviation programs to improve household incomes, as a basis for food security. Further studies have also been recommended to be carried out with male partners themselves to understand their perspective.</p> <p> </p> Emmanuel Ahimbisibwe Judah Turumanya Jane Frank Nalubega Copyright (c) 2024 Emmanuel Ahimbisibwe , Judah Turumanya, Jane Frank Nalubega https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 15 15 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.963 HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS VACCINATION AND ITS ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG FEMALE ADOLESCENTS (AGED 9-14 YEARS) ATTENDING KAJJANSI HEALTH CENTER IV IN WAKISO DISTRICT: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1035 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">The background of the study</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Uganda is overflowing with many women of reproductive age at risk of developing cervical cancer. Getting immunized with the HPV vaccine could be the only hope to avert this risk. WHO greatly recommends HPV vaccination to combat the spread of the HPV vaccine. However, despite availing the HPV vaccine in health facilities, its uptake remains stunted.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">The objective of the study</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The objective of the study was to determine the factors associated with the uptake of Human Papillomavirus vaccination among female adolescents attending Kajjansi Health Center IV in Wakiso district.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Study methods</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The study was of a cross-sectional descriptive design that utilized quantitative methods of data collection. This enabled the researcher to collect data from a large number of respondents (100 respondents) within a short period. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Results</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">A total of 100 questionnaires were collected. The<strong> s</strong>core rates of knowledge were 63%, and those of attitude towards its effectiveness were 46% and uptake rates were 54%. The main factors influencing knowledge were age, attitude towards its effectiveness, and the source of information. Altitude was affected by socioeconomic status, and the uptake was mainly affected by the side effects experienced. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Conclusions</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">It was evident that most participants had information about HPV vaccination, although it was insufficient for them to complete the series. The side effects of the vaccine, inadequate health worker recommendation, inadequate knowledge about the safety of the vaccine, and absence of school-based vaccination programs were observed to influence its uptake.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Recommendations</span></strong></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Mass sensitization of the public should go on to enhance a complete understanding of the need to start and complete the series of HPV vaccinations. Any program aimed at creating mass awareness about HPV vaccination at any level should be boosted by the people in charge.</span></p> Shibbah Ankunda Mariam Suubi Frank Ssemuwemba Jane Frank Nalubega Copyright (c) 2024 Shibbah Ankunda , Mariam Suubi , Frank Ssemuwemba , Jane Frank Nalubega https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1035 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICES TOWARDS CHILD IMMUNIZATION AMONG MOTHERS ATTENDING TO KISIITA HEALTH CENTER III, IN KAKUMIRO DISTRICT https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/856 <p><strong>Introduction</strong></p> <p>The burden of un-immunized children in Uganda is 48% of children under the age of five years who are not immunized at all or partially immunized meaning some of them start immunization but do not complete the immunization schedule.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong> </p> <p>The study was based on a purposive sampling method in which 117 mothers were enrolled in the study; the study employed a structured questionnaire which was administered by the researcher and the research assistants to collect data. </p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Majority of the mothers; we're in the 21- 30 age group 60(51.3%), 84(71.8%) were married, 50(42.7%) were banyankore by tribe, majority 63(53.8%) were farmers, 40(34.1%) were Catholics, those who attained secondary education level were 63(53.8%). Of those who had heard about child immunization 73%, majority 44(37.6%) heard about it from radio, majority 60(51.3%) mentioned fever as the side effect they know following immunization, 57(48.7%) mentioned 3 and more child immunizable diseases, and majority mentioned others about the importance of child immunization, 34(29.1%) mentioned that immunization promotes child health, 20(17.1%) it protects from serious diseases, 19(16.2%) reduces risk of child death rates. The majority, 71% of the respondents said yes in support of child immunization services being carried out, 68% agreed that they would encourage others to bring their children for immunization, and 70% said yes the support of immunization programs to continue. The majority 71% had ever taken their children for immunization.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions</strong></p> <p>Majority of the mothers knew child immunization, its importance towards their children’s health, and the VPDs. <strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>Government should come up with programs creating awareness concerning the importance of child immunization as well as providing health education to parents about the Vaccine Preventable Diseases.</p> <p> </p> JIBRIL KAZIBWE JUSTINE NEGESA Copyright (c) 2024 Jibril Kazibwe, Justine Negesa https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.856 ADVANCEMENTS IN MARBURG VIRUS VACCINE DEVELOPMENT: UNRAVELLING RECENT FINDINGS. A NARRATIVE REVIEW. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1015 <p>Marburg Virus Disease (MVD) is a lethal single-stranded RNA virus transmitted by Egyptian rousette bats, causing 12 surges in Sub-Saharan Africa, including a recent outbreak in Tanzania in 2023. With a fatality rate of approximately 90%, no approved vaccines currently exist. Ongoing research explores potential candidates, such as a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based vaccine and MVA-BN-Filo, aiming to combat this deadly infection. The objective of this review is to comprehensively examine Marburg virus vaccines, exploring various candidates and their development stages, efficacy in non-human primates and human studies, and challenges faced in the development process. Various vaccines are under development, including Ad26, Ad5, viral vector, and DNA vaccines. Promising candidates like Ad26.Filo and ChAd3-MARV have emerged. Additionally, VLP-based, DNA plasmid and rVSV-based vaccines are discussed, highlighting their effectiveness and challenges in development, such as limited information, gene expression issues, and outbreak control measures. The implications for future research and clinical practice/policy development are significant. Marburg virus vaccine development shows promise in mitigating the threat posed by this deadly pathogen. Despite complex challenges, advancements in vaccine candidates offer hope. Continued research and development may lead to the successful prevention of major Marburg virus outbreaks. Ongoing clinical trials indicate potential breakthroughs in a short period, contributing to public health protection.</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p> </p> Amna Zaheer Daniyah Zehra Hussain Ahmad Akhtar Copyright (c) 2024 Amna Zaheer, Daniyah Zehra Hussain, Ahmad Akhtar https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 19 19 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1015 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES OF MOTHERS TOWARDS CHILD IMMUNISATION AT GOMBE DISTRICT HOSPITAL, BUTAMBALA DISTRICT. ACROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/849 <p><strong>Introduction</strong></p> <p>Immunization is the process whereby a person is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically by administering a vaccine. These vaccines help to stimulate the body’s immune system to protect the person against subsequent infection or disease.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>This was a cross-sectional study that employed a random sampling method and each participant was assessed using a pre-designed questionnaire. Data was analyzed by use of paper, pens, and tallying and presented in tables and pie-charts for easy interpretation</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p> majority 63.2% had heard about immunization before, 50% knew that the importance of immunization was to strengthen their children’s ability to fight against childhood immunizable diseases, attitude of mothers towards immunization majority 90% agreed that immunization was of importance towards a child’s health, most of the mothers (79%) say they would encourage other mothers to bring their children for immunization majority of the mothers (64.2%) believe it’s safe to vaccinate their children. Regarding practices of mothers towards immunization; the majority (77.9%) fully immunize their children and the minority (22.1%) did not fully immunize their children because of the fear of the post-vaccination side effects.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>majority of the mothers know child immunization, its importance towards their children’s health, and when a child needs to be vaccinated, the vids and the recommended sites for different vaccines, mothers generally had good attitude towards immunization of children since all had ever brought their children for immunization and mothers had good practices for immunization of their children which was portrayed by most of the children being fully immunized.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p> Government should come up with programs creating awareness concerning the importance of child immunization and delivery of immunization services at all health facilities among various communities as this is associated with a higher likelihood of child immunization.</p> Resty Namutebi Lydia Anywar Copyright (c) 2024 Resty Namutebi, Lydia Anywar https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.849 THE PREVALENCE AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH INDUCED ABORTION AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING THE MATERNITY DEPARTMENT AT KITEBI HEALTH CENTRE III IN KAMPALA DISTRICT.A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/850 <p><strong>Purpose of the study</strong></p> <p>Was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with induced abortion among patients attending the maternity department at Kitebi Health Centre III in Kampala district.<strong> <br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Objectives</strong></p> <p>The specific objectives were to identify the prevalence, identify the predisposing factors for induced abortion, and determine health service-related factors leading to abortion among patients attending the maternity department at Kitebi Health Centre III.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>The study employed a cross-sectional study design. Data was collected by questionnaire method using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Respondents were sampled by a convenient sampling technique. Data was analyzed manually and presented in tables and pie charts.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The prevalence of induced abortions was found to be 9.4%. predisposing factors that were associated with abortions included; the age of 18-25 (55.6%), having children more than 5 (44.4%), being married (44.4%), alcohol consumption (55.6%), higher level of education (44.4%). Health service-related factors included; not including contraceptive methods in health education (55.6%), not counseling on reproductive health services (55.6%%), abortions done in places outside the health facilities (77.0%), and access to abortion services (77.8%)</p> <p><strong>Conclusions</strong></p> <p>The study established that the prevalence of induced abortion was high. The predisposing factors were age 18-25, being married, alcohol consumption, many live births, and having tertiary/university education. Health service-related factors were lack of counseling in reproductive health and contraceptives and access to surgical and nonsurgical abortion services.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>There is a need to provide counseling on contraceptive methods, provisions of contraceptives with regular supplies, and training of health workers on contraceptives so that they enrich their knowledge of various contraceptive methods.</p> DUNGU KATO LYDIA ANYWAR Copyright (c) 2024 Dungu Kato, Lydia Anywar https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 8 8 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.850 A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY ABOUT FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH TEENAGE PREGNANCY AMONG TEENAGE GIRLS AT KAYUNGA HOSPITAL KAYUNGA DISTRICT. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/854 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>The purpose of the study was to determine the factors associated with teenage pregnancy among teenage girls at Kayunga Hospital Kayunga district. Specific objectives were to determine the knowledge of teenage girls toward teenage pregnancy and the socio-economic factors associated with teenage pregnancy among teenage girls.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 teenagers in Kayunga Hospital Kayunga district. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, entered, and analyzed appropriately.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The majority of the respondent 69(69%) had not heard of teenage pregnancy whereas 31(31%) had heard. Most of the respondents 10(33.3%) sourced information about teenage pregnancy from school whereas 5(16.7%) from parents. The majority of the respondents 68(68%) stated that the father of the child is an elderly man whereas 32(32%) stated young man is the father. Peer pressure was the most cited reason for indulgence in sexual activities 45(45%), and culture accounted for 8(8%).</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion </strong></p> <p>The results have presented a lack of knowledge among the teenagers as the majority have not heard of teenage pregnancy. The socio-economic factor predisposed most of the respondents to sexual activities.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>Community sensitization, comprehensive sexuality education, and ensuring girls enroll and stay in schools could reduce adolescent pregnancy rates. Also, the provision of adolescent-friendly health services in schools and healthcare centers and the initiation of adolescent empowerment programs could have a positive impact.</p> Phionah Namutebi Joash Odiwuor Otieno Denis dyamuhaki Copyright (c) 2024 Phionah Namutebi, Joash Odiwuor Otieno, Denis dyamuhaki https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 8 8 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.854 FACTORS AFFECTING THE UPTAKE OF CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING SERVICES AMONG WOMEN AGED 15-49 YEARS ATTENDING KIBOGA HOSPITAL IN KIBOGA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1007 <p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>The objectives are to find out the knowledge about cervical cancer screening services, sociodemographic factors affecting the uptake of cervical cancer screening services, and the attitude of women aged 15-49 years towards cervical cancer screening services attending Kiboga Hospital in Kiboga district.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>The study employed the cross-sectional study design. This study was conducted at Kiboga Hospital in Kiboga District in the Outpatient Department from 5<sup>th </sup>July 2023 to 5<sup>th</sup> August 2023.</p> <p> <strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The results of the study were that the majority of the respondents, 55 (55%), did not know about cervical screening services, and 64% knew that cervical cancer screening should be done at least once. The majority, 58 (58%), said that cervical cancer screening was important because it ensures early diagnosis and treatment. The majority, 74 (74%) believed that cervical cancer screening is important. The majority, 62 (62%), believed that religious belief cannot protect them from cervical cancer. The majority of respondents, 57 (57%) aged 15-32 years were willing to participate in cervical cancer screening. The majority, 89 (89%) had never screened.</p> <p><strong> Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The respondents had little knowledge about cervical cancer screening services and established that the sociodemographic factors affecting cervical cancer screening were the age of the respondent, employment, and level of education. It also found that the respondents had a good attitude towards cervical cancer screening.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>The Ministry of Health should do more health education for women about the existence of cervical cancer screening services, the government should ensure the empowerment of women in education and the government should empower women in employment through affirmative action. Also, the government should encourage women to cervical cancer screening. Health workers should continuously encourage women to participate in cervical cancer screening.</p> VICTOR SSENTONGO LYDIA ANYWAR Copyright (c) 2024 VICTOR SSENTONGO, LYDIA ANYWAR https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 13 13 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1007 UTILISATION OF POSTNATAL SERVICES: A DESCRIPTIVE CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY CONDUCTED AMONG MOTHERS AT DR. RONALD BATTA MEMORIAL HOSPITAL. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/911 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Utilization of Post Natal Care (PNC) services has been associated with huge benefits to both the mother and the baby. This care which is given from immediately after birth up to six weeks after delivery is a recommended package in the continuum of maternal care aimed at reducing maternal and neonatal mortality. Timely PNC enables health workers to detect, follow, and quickly manage complications of both the mother and newborn. Despite the benefits, there’s still underutilization of the services in some health facilities in low-income countries. Therefore, the study aimed at assessing factors that were influencing utilization of post-natal care services among mothers at Dr. Ronald Batta Memorial Hospital, Wakiso district.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among 36 post-natal mothers, who were selected using simple random sampling at DR. Ronald Batta Memorial Hospital. Self-administered questionnaires were used for data collection and data was analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2021<strong>.</strong></p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Utilization of PNC was 69.4 % (25/36). Those who did not utilize the PNC did not know its benefits 7(63.6%), rural residents 7(63.6%) and long waiting hours 10(90.9%) were among the factors that influenced the utilization of postnatal services. The study established that the lack of awareness, rural residence, long waiting hours, and non-friendly health workers influenced the utilization of post-Natal services.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusions</strong></p> <p>The study established that the Poor attitude towards the utilization of PNC services, age, non-supportive Cultures towards utilization of PNC services, rural residence, long waiting hours, and unfriendly Health workers influenced the utilization of PNC among mothers.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>MoH should support health facilities to increase awareness about the benefits of attending PNC clinics. Health facilities should provide follow-up services and training to increase awareness. More funds should be allocated to PNC services awareness programs. Health workers can also start providing door-to-door PNC services.</p> Elizabeth Karungi Hasifa Hussein Immaculate Naggulu Copyright (c) 2024 ELIZABETH KARUNGI , Hasifa Hussein, Immaculate Naggulu https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 8 8 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.911 PUERPERAL SEPSIS AND ITS ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG POSTNATAL MOTHERS AT MUKONO GENERAL HOSPITAL, MUKONO DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1036 <p><strong>Introduction: </strong></p> <p>This study was on factors associated with puerperal sepsis among postnatal mothers at Mukono General Hospital, Mukono District. It was guided by two specific objectives: assess the prevalence, individual-related factors, and health facility-related factors associated with puerperal sepsis among postnatal mothers at Mukono General Hospital, Mukono District.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong></p> <p>This study used a descriptive cross-sectional study design and employed quantitative and qualitative data collection approaches. The study was carried out at Mukono General Hospital, Mukono District. The study population for this study comprised postpartum mothers with puerperal sepsis at Mukono General Hospital, Mukono District. The sample size of 30 postpartum mothers with puerperal sepsis who participated in this study was sampled using a simple random sampling procedure. The questionnaire was used for data collection and analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2019. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The study established that the socio-demographic characteristics that were associated with puerperal sepsis were age between 18 – 25 years (57%), rural residence (63%), low levels of education (50%); Furthermore individual related factors included utilization of herbal medicine (63%), tears during delivery (53%), resumption of sexual intercourse before 7 days of peuperium (53%); Finally health facility related factors included lack of follow up services during peuperium (60%), negative attitude of health workers (63%). </p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong></p> <p>The study established that the socio-demographic characteristics that were associated with puerperal sepsis were age between 18 – 25 years, rural residence, and low levels of education; furthermore, individual-related factors included utilization of herbal medicine, tears during delivery, resumption of sexual intercourse before 7 days of puerperium; Finally, health facility related factors included lack of follow up services during puerperium, negative attitude of health workers.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation: </strong></p> <p>Health workers should provide follow-up services to postnatal mothers after delivery.</p> <p>Health facilities should conduct training to improve the attitude of health workers to postnatal mothers.</p> Molly Kasasa Mariam Suubi Francisco Ssemuwemba Jane Frank Nalubega Copyright (c) 2024 Molly Kasasa, Mariam Suubi , Francisco Ssemuwemba , Jane Frank Nalubega https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 13 13 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1036 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES ABOUT YOUTH-FRIENDLY REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES AMONG STUDENTS AT MEDICARE HEALTH PROFESSIONALS COLLEGE, MENGO. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/847 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>The term Youth Friendly Reproductive Health Service (YFRHS) refers to those services that are accessible, acceptable, and appropriate for youths such as contraceptive methods; quality obstetric and Antenatal care for all pregnant women and girls and prevention and management of sexually transmitted infections including HIV.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>The study employed a cross-sectional study design where 116 respondents were conveniently sampled and comprised young adults both male and female aged between 18-24 years admitted at Medicare Health Professionals’ College, Mengo. Data analysis was presented in tables and figures.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The majority 113(97.4%) of the respondents had heard about YFRH services, 44(37.9%) of the respondents heard about HIV counseling and testing, while only 6(5.2%) knew of post-abortion care. 69(59.5%) of the respondents did not agree that discussion about contraceptives promotes immorality. 46(39.7%) felt embarrassed to buy condoms from the shop/ health facility. 61(52.6%) of the respondents did not agree that contraceptives are linked to sterility. The highest number 72(62.1%) had ever visited a health facility for YFRH services in the last 12 months. The majority 39(54.1%) of the respondents had used family planning services, only 1(1.4%) had gone for antenatal care while none had post-abortion care.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The majority of the respondents were knowledgeable about YFRH services, most heard services were family planning and HIV counseling and testing while the least known were antenatal and post about care services. The majority did not agree that discussion about contraceptives with young people promotes immorality. Most respondents had ever visited a health facility for YFRH services with the majority having used family planning services.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>The Ministry of Health should create more awareness regarding youth services such as STI screening and treatment, antenatal care, and post-abortion care to address the high number of unplanned pregnancies and unsafe abortions present.</p> JOSEPHINE CLAIRE NAMBEJJA LYDIA ANYWAR Copyright (c) 2024 JOSEPHINE CLAIRE NAMBEJJA, LYDIA ANYWAR https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.847 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICES TOWARDS INSECTICIDE-TREATED MOSQUITO NET UTILIZATION AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CARE AT MASAKA REGIONAL REFERAL HOSPITAL, MASAKA DISTRICT: A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1019 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>In Uganda, the Masaka district Health sector platform statistics from the Ministry of Health show malaria as the highest disease burden with 22.2%. Hence, as a result, ITNs have been well recognized there as part of the important components of Global and National malaria control policies.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Objective</strong></p> <p>To determine the knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards ITN utilization among pregnant women attending ANC at Masaka Regional Referral Hospital, Masaka District.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>A cross-section descriptive survey design was employed; 59 respondents were selected using a simple random sampling technique. Data was collected using a questionnaire and analyzed using frequency and percentages descriptive statistics.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Study findings indicate majority 36(61%) knew their importance during pregnancy, 42(71.2%) knew what is correctly done before the first usage of an ITN, and some 16(27%) knew at least one of the two types of ITNs. A generally poor attitude towards ITN utilization among pregnant women was shown as up to 39(66%) didn’t like to sleep in it, 36(61%) felt bad while sleeping under it, and 41(69.5%) believed that sleeping in it is not the only way to prevent malaria. Good practices towards ITN utilization were observed as a large number of 44(74.5%) slept under it, 30(50.8%) started sleeping in it during the first trimester, and 44(75%) hung their ITNs above the bed.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>In summary, there was a high level of knowledge, poor attitude, and generally good practices about the utilization of ITNs among respondents.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>The government needs to ensure the motivation of pregnant women to create a culture and enhance their understanding of ITNs. Direct health education through various mediums of communication should be carried out by the health workers. Health authorities should enhance the training of volunteers and local leaders towards proper utilization of ITNs through various directed programs by experts.</p> CAROLINE NAKAWOZA HENRY KASUJJA Copyright (c) 2024 CAROLINE NAKAWOZA , MR. KASUJJA HENRY https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 18 18 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1019 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH LOW UTILIZATION OF CONTRACEPTIVES AMONG WOMEN AGED 15-49 YEARS AT RWAMWANJA HCIII, KAMWENGE DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/811 <p><strong>Introduction:</strong></p> <p>Contraception refers to |the practice of utilizing contraceptive methods intended to prevent or space future pregnancy. Contraceptive use is reported as the actual utilization or intake of contraception in the last year.</p> <p><strong>Objectives</strong>: The broad objective was to determine factors associated with low utilization of contraceptives while specific objectives were to determine the knowledge of women aged 15-49 about contraceptives and facility-based factors affecting utilization of contraceptives by women aged 15-49 at Rwamwanja HC III.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that employed a random sampling method and each participant was assessed using a pre-designed questionnaire.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong>:</p> <p>According to study100% were knowledgeable at least of one family planning method used by women in the reproductive age, pills (35.1%) were the most known method, followed by injections (25.9%), implants (19.5%), condoms (13%) and IUCD (6.5%) respectively. Distance, stockouts, health workers’ attitudes, and fear of side effects were the health-based factors that affected the utilization of contraceptives by women of reproductive age.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion: </strong></p> <p>The respondents were highly knowledgeable about family planning methods with pills as the most known and IUCD being the least known. The majority of the respondents reported long distance as their main hindrance to the utilization of FP services as it limited their access to the health facility while the least reported lack of privacy.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation:</strong></p> <p>The government through the MoH extends the family planning services up to the village level to increase accessibility to all communities for example through awareness campaigns with help from community-based Resource Person and VHTs as well as enhancing the integration of lessons about family planning services into schools.</p> ANNITAH TUSASIRWE JOASH ODIWUOR OTIENO Copyright (c) 2024 ANNITAH TUSASIRWE, MR. OTIENO JOASH ODIWUOR https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 9 9 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.811 KNOWLEDGE, PRACTICES, AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS NEWBORN CARE BY THE MOTHERS AGED 18-49 YEARS IN THE POSTNATAL WARD AT RUKUNYU HOSPITAL IN KAMWENGE DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/928 <p><strong>Introduction</strong></p> <p>Essential newborn care refers to a series of time-bound and chronologically ordered care that a baby receives at birth and early days of his or her life. </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Objectives of the study</strong></p> <p>The main objective was to determine the knowledge, practices, and attitudes towards newborn care by mothers aged 18-49 years in the post-natal ward at Rukunyu Hospital in Kamwenge district.</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used while using a quantitative approach at the post-natal ward of Rukunyu Hospital in Kamwenge district. The researcher conveniently sampled 96 respondents from 18th June 2023 to 30th July 2023. Data was collected using self-administered questionnaires.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Of the 96 respondents, the majority (90.6%) had heard about newborn care and all of the mothers (100%) accepted that newborn care was very important and that all babies should receive this essential care. Furthermore, 68.8% of the mothers agreed to the fact that essential newborn care practices are 100% effective in ensuring infant’s survival and well-being in their initial days of life. Finally, the respondents’ attitude towards newborn care was generally good because all mothers (100%) agreed that all newborns should be taken good care of.</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The study generally revealed that at least many mothers have learned some of the common essential newborn care practices especially exclusive breastfeeding (87.5%), provision of warmth (96.9%), and bathing neonates(93.7%) but still have a challenge with performing other practices, especially cord care(84.4%) due to knowledge gap.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p> Government through the Ministry of Health should increase public sensitization about newborn care practices. More of the recommendations are presented in chapter five of this report. </p> Innocent Tumushabe Daisy Kiyingi Copyright (c) 2024 INNOCENT TUMUSHABE, Daisy Kiyingi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 9 9 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.928 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH NEONATAL SEPSIS AMONG NEONATES AT KISENYI HEALTH CENTRE IV IN KAMPALA DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/910 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Neonatal sepsis is a systemic bacterial illness that affects neonates under the age of 28 days with or without bacteremia and in Uganda, 18.2% of the 19 per 1000 neonatal deaths are contributed by neonatal sepsis affecting the progress in improving maternal and child health. The purpose of the study was to determine the factors associated with neonatal sepsis among neonates in Kisenyi Health Centre IV, Kampala District.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>The study used a descriptive cross-sectional study design that used quantitative data collection methods. A simple random sampling method was used to select 40 respondents. Data was analyzed and presented using Microsoft Excel 2013 that presented it in the form of frequency tables, pie charts, and graphs.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Findings</strong></p> <p>The findings of the study on maternal factors associated with neonatal sepsis were; that 70% had never attended antenatal care, 80% had untreated UTI during pregnancy and 60% had bathed the baby with herbs. Neonate-related factors included; 60% had babies born before 8 months and 70% had second to fifth order. Health facility–related factors; 60% had more than three vaginal examinations, 70% had not received antibiotics before delivery and 90% reported that wards were congested.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The study concluded that factors associated with neonatal sepsis were maternal factors, neonate-related, and health facility-related factors. Therefore, health education on appropriate neonatal care practices and adjustment of the quality of maternal and neonatal care practices should be done to reduce incidences of neonatal sepsis.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>Ministry of Health should offer refresher training to health workers regarding the management of mothers in labor like avoiding unnecessary vaginal examinations. Furthermore, antibiotics should be supplied to health facilities to ensure routine provision among neonates.</p> Angellah Wanjjiro Hasifa Hussein Janefrank Nalubega Copyright (c) 2024 Angellah Wanjjiro, Hasifa Hussein, Janefrank Nalubega https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 9 9 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.910 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND PRACTICES ASSOCIATED WITH MALNUTRITION IN CHILDREN UNDER 5 YEARS OF AGE AT RUKUNYU HOSPITAL, KAMWENGE DISTRICT. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/845 <p><strong>Introduction</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>The main objective was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of caretakers on malnutrition among children less than 5 years at Rukunyu Hospital, Kamwenge district.</p> <p>The specific objectives were to assess the knowledge of caretakers, to determine the attitudes of caretakers, and to identify the practices of caretakers towards malnutrition among children below five years at Rukunyu Hospital, Kamwenge district.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used, using a quantitative approach at Rukunyu Hospital Kamwenge district. The researcher conveniently sampled on 86 respondents from 25th June 2023 to 27th July 2023. Data collection was done by using self-administered questionnaires.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>Out of the 86 respondents. The majority; 59(69%) knew the importance and nutritious effects of first thick milk. The majority; 74(86%) agreed that a balanced diet was important in preventing malnutrition. The majority; 80(93%) indicated that they did not have enough time to attend to their children. majority 42% of the caretakers initiated their babies on breast milk within 1 hour after delivery.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>The study showed that despite the caretakers knowing initiation of breastfeeding after delivery within one hour, a number of them did not adhere to the attitudes and this was affiliated to the limited resources to do so.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong>:</p> <p>There is a need for the caretakers to adhere to the practices and knowledge acquired to affect results concerning the improvement of the nutrition status of children. The health care providers should educate the public on other practices that reduce on malnutrition like exclusive breastfeeding, and should be advised on how and when to introduce supplementary feeds during the growth cycle of the children.</p> <p> </p> BENSON BYAMUKAMA JUSTINE NEGESA Copyright (c) 2024 BENSON BYAMUKAMA, JUSTINE NEGESA https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 15 15 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.845 EVALUATION OF SERUM TROPONIN I LEVEL IN SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME CORONA VIRUS 2 (SARS COV2) INFECTED PATIENTS ADMITTED IN CORONA VIRUS (COVID) WARD AND INTENSIVE CARE UNIT IN SILCHAR MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL, ASSAM: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1024 <p><strong>Background: </strong></p> <p>The pandemic of COVID-19 led to the mortality of a large number of people worldwide. In several studies carried out in different parts of the world, it was seen that cardiac troponin I is a prognosticating biochemical marker of SARS-CoV2-infected patients. This present study aimed to evaluate the serum troponin I level in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infected patients admitted to covid ward and COVID ICU and to find out any relationship between cardiac Troponin I and disease prognosis. This will aid in early diagnosis.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methodology:</strong></p> <p>102 patients participated in this study. Among the 102 patients of SARS COV 2 infection, 49 patients were taken from the Covid ward suffering from mild or moderate form of the disease. The remaining 53 patients were taken from the ICU who were critically ill. Serum cardiac Troponin I value was collected from the Laboratory Information System of the hospital and all the data was analyzed statistically.</p> <p><em> </em><strong>Results: </strong></p> <p>Cardiac Troponin I level is higher in covid positive critically ill patients admitted to ICU with COVID-19. The median (IQR) value of serum cardiac Troponin I is significantly higher (0.0190 ng/ml) in COVID-19 ICU patients than in the COVID patients of the General ward (0.0120 ng/ml). The difference was found to be significant with a p-value of 0.00. A p-value of &lt;0.05 was considered statistically significant.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion</strong>: </p> <p>Serum Troponin I can be used as a prognosticating marker in COVID-19 infection and a marker of ICU admission in COVID-19-positive patients.</p> <p><em> </em><strong>Recommendation:</strong><em> </em></p> <p>More studies will be required with a large number of study samples to establish the findings of the present study.</p> Biswadeep Choudhury Rajarshi Bhowal Soumyamoy Das Manidip Chakraborty Copyright (c) 2024 Biswadeep Choudhury, Rajarshi Bhowal, Soumyamoy Das, Manidip Chakraborty https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 6 6 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1024 FACTORS AFFECTING DATA QUALITY IN PRIVATE FACILITIES IN KALUNGU DISTRICT.THE CASE OF ST. JOSEPH OF GOOD SHEPHERD KYAMULIBWA H/C IV. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/972 <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Background</span></strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">: </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">To find out how external and internal factors affect data quality in Private facilities in Kalungu district. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Methodology:</span></strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The study used a cross-sectional research design on a population that involved the staff of St Joseph of Good Shepherd Kyamulibwa H/ C IV. A total of 32 respondents were selected for the study. Both random and non-random sampling techniques were used in selecting the samples. The study was guided by a quantitative model. Data from the questionnaires was analyzed quantitatively using Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS) Data from questionnaires was presented in the form of frequency tables and bar graphs. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Results:</span></strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Females were 18(56%) and 14 (44%) were males whose age was between 18 and above years. In regards to internal factors that affect data quality (69%) strongly agreed that the Compilation of inaccurate data by departments automatically distorts data quality in the long run, while 4(12%) disagreed that most departments don’t have consistent data models that would ensure the integrity and quality of the data. 1(3%) strongly disagreed that the Completeness of information entered into the facility record is not dependable. In regards to the external factors, 13(41%) strongly agreed that monitoring and keeping track of data over time and reporting variations in the data affects the quality of data. While 1(3%) strongly disagreed that data compiled by departments is not relevant to what user’s health needs requirements.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Conclusion:</span></strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">The study findings confirmed that internal and external factors negatively affect data quality in private facilities. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="color: #0e101a;"> </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;">Recommendation:</span></strong><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: #0e101a;"> </span></p> <p style="margin: 0in; margin-bottom: .0001pt; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 9.5pt; color: #0e101a;">Private facilities should invest in formal training for all staff in data management, M&amp;E topics included in the facilities’ Continuous Medical Education (CME) sessions to translate into the culture of data demand and information use (DDIU), Mentorships, and forming Quality improvement projects (QI) to promote sustainability in private facilities.</span></p> Peter Wabwire David Asimwe Janefrank Nalubega Edith Akankwasa Copyright (c) 2024 Peter Wabwire , David Asimwe, Janefrank Nalubega, Edith Akankwasa https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 11 11 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.972 ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECT OF THE MEDICAL STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS ON SERVICE DELIVERY: A CASE OF KISWA HEALTH CENTRE IV. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/968 <p><strong>Background:</strong> </p> <p>This study aimed at assessing the effect of the Medical Storage and Retrieval Systems on Service Delivery.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong></p> <p>This study adopted an analytical and cross-sectional research design that aimed at data collection for two or more variables examined at a single point in time to detect variable patterns of association. The study targeted a sample of 156 respondents and the sample respondents were drawn from the top management and middle-level staff as well as the outgoing patients from Kiswa Health Centre IV. 150 questionnaires were effectively filled in for analysis translating to a 96.2% response rate. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS on the information gathered to generate descriptive statistics. The presentation of results was done in tables and figures.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>In terms of the impact of medical retrieval systems used for patient records on Service Delivery, the results indicated that medical retrieval systems positively impact Service Delivery at Kiswa Health Centre IV, this is indicated by a correlation coefficient, r =.878 whose p-value is less than 0.01. In line with the effect of the medical storage systems used on the Service Delivery, the results of the study established that there was a positive and significant relationship between the Medical Storage System and Service Delivery of Kiswa Health Centre (r =.743, p-value&lt;0.01). </p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusion:</strong> </p> <p>The major challenges faced with the storage and retrieval of patient records at Kiswa Health Centre IV were the inefficient retrieval process, the breakdown with the integration of electronic health records, data loss or corruption challenges, training and adoption of the system challenges, data migration challenges, inadequate staff to operate the systems and finally the disorganization in record management.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendation:</strong> </p> <p>There is a need to recruit more medical personnel to improve the service delivery at Kiswa Health Centre IV given the challenge of inadequate resources.</p> Adrine Mpirirwe David Asimwe Janefrank Nalubega Copyright (c) 2024 Adrine Mpirirwe , David Asimwe, Janefrank Nalubega https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 11 11 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.968 MEDICAL RECORDS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN THE MANAGEMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS IN ST. FRANCIS NSAMBYA HOSPITAL: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/970 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>The study aimed to assess the Medical Records Management System (MRMS) in the Management of Tuberculosis Patients at St. Francis Nsambya Hospital.</p> <p><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional design was used to assess the current state of the MRMS, including its structure, utilization, and functionality at a single point in time. The study targets the staff in the TB clinic who use the existing medical records management systems to manage TB patients. Participants were sampled using a non-probability method, specifically purposive sampling. The study encompassed qualitative data collection from home care section, where the TB clinic is found, including a target study population, face-to-face interviews, document review guide, and observation guides.</p> <p><strong>Result</strong></p> <p>The study had a total of 12 participants but only 9 responded. The majority of which were record program administrators (75%) &amp; had 2-2.9 years of experience in using the medical records. Pertaining to the status of TB records many (83.3%) said that TB records were in an active state, while the rest reported they were in both active and semiactive states. All respondents (100%) confirmed the use of a centralized system. Identified challenges in filing and storage of TB records were: Misfiling and misplacement of records (100%), Delayed retrieval of records (100%), Overcrowding of files on shelves (66.7%), Lack of sufficient staff with expertise in records filing and storage (50%) and inadequate storage equipment (50%).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The back-to-front filing method used in the hospital, ensured the strategic placement of new documents on top of preceding ones, simplifying document retrieval. The findings highlighted the hospital's commitment to systematic filing practices, furthermore the hospital's dedication to maintaining accessible records for current healthcare activities. Moreover, the need for targeted interventions to enhance records management practices.</p> <p><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>Methods towards filing and storage need to be improved, challenges addressed, and enhancement in record management</p> Gift Nebyeye David Asimwe Glorious Orishaba Copyright (c) 2024 Gift Nebyeye , David Asimwe, Glorious Orishaba https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 10 10 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.970 ASSESSMENT OF THE QUALITY OF ROOF HARVESTED RAINWATER: A CASE STUDY OF KYENGERA TOWN COUNCIL, AKISO DISTRICT.A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/908 <p><strong>Introduction</strong></p> <p>To assess the knowledge about the quality of roof-harvested rainwater for domestic use and determine the prevalence of coliforms and <em>E. coli</em> in roof-harvested rainwater in Kyengera Town Council, Wakiso district.</p> <p><strong>Methods </strong></p> <p>Across cross-sectional survey was conducted in Kyengera town council on the homesteads that performed roof rainwater harvesting between December 2022 and January 2023 on a sample of 196 homesteads.<em>. </em>Quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 26.0 and presented in a tabular form using frequencies and percentages for easy interpretation. Bar graphs, box and whisker plots, and pi-charts were used to represent the data. </p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The participants were mainly male (52.9%), aged 46-60 years (55.1%), with education level above secondary (55.1%) and non-formal employment. The majority of them (55.1%) had harvested rainwater for over 10 years. </p> <p>Most of the samples were collected from inhabitants of Kitemu and Kyengera with 17.3% each. The results have shown that 94 (48.0%) of the samples were suspected to contain total coliforms with colon-forming units ranging from 2 to 250x105/ml. The prevalence of <em>E. coli</em> was 7.14%. Finally, 96.9% of the participants were aware of the influence of RHRW quality on its use as well as the potential contaminants of RHRW but needed to be reminded about tank cleaning. </p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>The contamination of the roof-harvested rainwater collected within Kyengera town council with <em>E. coli</em> and other coliforms was high and is exacerbated by poor water tank hygiene. </p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>Treatment of roof-harvested rainwater should be done before consumption of the water due to the associated contamination with coliforms and <em>E. coli</em>. This will reduce the prevalence of total coliforms and E. coli in roof-harvested rainwater which would cause waterborne diarrheas. </p> KAFEERO HUSSEIN MUKASA Johnson Bwambale Copyright (c) 2024 Kafeero Hussein Mukasa, Johnson Bwambale https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 14 14 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.908 FACTORS INFLUENCING THE MANAGEMENT AND PREVENTION OF FUNGAL SKIN INFECTIONS AMONG CHILDREN UNDER THE AGE OF 5 SEEKING HEALTH CARE AT KAJANSI HEALTH CENTRE IV. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1034 <p><strong>Purpose</strong></p> <p>This study assessed factors influencing the management and prevention of fungal skin infections in children under 5 years seeking care at Kajansi Health Centre IV in Uganda.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Objectives</strong></p> <p>The objectives were to examine caregiver knowledge, attitudes, and practices; health system-related factors; and social demographic factors impacting fungal infection prevention and management.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional study design was utilized. Data was collected through interviews with 100 caregivers of children under 5 with fungal skin infections at Kajansi Health Centre IV. A systematic random sampling technique was used to select participants from health center records. Structured questionnaires covering caregiver experiences, health system factors, and demographic details were administered.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>The Highest proportion (40) of the respondents were caretakers of children in a range of 1-2 years with the lowest observed among 5 years. Knowledge gaps among caregivers regarding causes, transmission, severity, and prevention. Variable attitudes were found, with concerns about stigma but also misconceptions of mildness. Health system weaknesses existed in workforce capacity, medication supply, and prioritization of fungal infections. Poverty, rural residence, and young age emerged as demographic factors increasing infection risk and care access barriers. Long waiting times, medication stock-outs, and financial limitations were commonly cited health system barriers.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Conclusions</strong></p> <p>Targeted education, health system strengthening, and tailored interventions for high-risk groups are necessary to address identified knowledge, attitudinal, and health system limitations negatively impacting fungal infection prevention and management.</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Recommendations</strong></p> <p>Recommendations include developing national guidelines designating fungal infections as a priority issue; integrating caregiver education into outreach; ensuring consistent medication availability; improving rural access through outreach; establishing community initiatives to address financial barriers; and strengthening health workforce capacity.</p> Andrew Cohen Bbaale Suubi Nalubega Francisco Ssemuwemba Jane Frank Nalubega Copyright (c) 2024 Andrew Cohen Bbaale , Suubi Nalubega, Francisco Ssemuwemba , Jane Frank Nalubega https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 12 12 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1034 FACTORS INFLUENCING ORAL CONTRACEPTIVE UTILIZATION AMONG WOMEN ATTENDING FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES AT NAKASEKE HOSPITAL IN NAKASEKE DISTRICT. A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/820 <p><strong>Introduction</strong><strong>: </strong></p> <p>Oral contraceptives are pills taken orally by women after having unprotected sex to prevent pregnancies. Oral contraception pills consist of the hormones progestin and estrogen, or only progestin.</p> <p><strong>Purpose:</strong><strong> </strong></p> <p>To determine factors influencing oral contraceptive utilization among women attending family planning services at Nakaseke Hospital in Nakaseke district. </p> <p><strong>Study Objectives:</strong></p> <p>The objectives of the study were; to identify the socio-demographic factors, knowledge, and the effects of oral contraceptive utilization among women attending family planning services at Nakaseke Hospital in Nakaseke district.</p> <p><strong>Study methodology:</strong> </p> <p>This study employed a quantitative descriptive cross-sectional study design with a sample size of 87, descriptive statistics like percentages, and frequencies, were used to analyze data and presented in frequency tables, pie charts, and graphs.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> <strong> </strong></p> <p>The majority 53(60.9%) of respondents reside in urban areas where the majority attained secondary education at 15(46.9%) for which the husband's decision in a home significantly influenced his wife's family planning method at 32(36.8%). The majority 84(96.6%) had ever heard about OC use in their lifetime where the source of information is hospitals through health professionals at 60(68%). The majority (98%) had ever experienced side effects of OC use for which the majority 36 ( 41.4%) of them agreed that OC use can cause specific side effects.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong><strong> </strong></p> <p>18(34%) were using OC with the majority residing in urban areas at 53(60.9%), the majority attained secondary education at 15(38.5%) with husbands influencing decision-making on the family type at home at 19(59. 4%). 96.6% knew OC use and had obtained information from hospitals at 60(68%) with the majority ever experiencing side effects of OC use at (97.7%)</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong>:</p> <p>More campaigns on the importance of OC use to women should be done through sexual health education, seminars, carrying out counseling, and psychological support to women who fear the side effects of OC use.</p> Daniel Niima Richard Onyango Copyright (c) 2023 Daniel Niima , Richard Onyango https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 11 11 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.820 DETERMINANTS OF PREGNANCY AMONG YOUNG FEMALES IN UGANDA AGED 15-29 YEARS, A CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS. https://sjhresearchafrica.org/index.php/public-html/article/view/1003 <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Uganda grapples with a significant global total fertility rate of 5.4, marked by a growing youth demographic aged 15 to 29 and elevated pregnancy rates. This poses a pivotal challenge to Uganda's Vision 2040. This study aims to scrutinize the determinants of youth pregnancy in Uganda.</p> <p><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>Utilizing data from the 2016 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey, this study focuses on a sample comprising 10,900 women aged 15-29 years. A multiple logistic regression with the binary outcome variable "ever got pregnant" is estimated, using dummy variables as predictors. The model assesses the odds of pregnancy among young females, contrasting those who have ever been pregnant with those who have not. Model specification is validated through the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, with acceptance of the null hypothesis indicating a well-fitted model based on the F-statistic and p-value.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>This study unveils a substantial prevalence of pregnancy among young females (62.4%). Those who completed secondary or higher education exhibit a lower likelihood of ever getting pregnant (OR=0.26, 95% CI 0.14-0.50; OR=0.18, 95% CI 0.11-0.29) compared to their uneducated counterparts. Literacy levels reduce the odds of pregnancy, while ownership of a mobile phone or listening to the radio increases them. Additionally, higher wealth quintiles correlate with reduced odds of ever getting pregnant (poorer OR=0.78, 95% CI 0.65-0.94; middle OR=0.53, 95% CI 0.42-0.65; richer OR=0.44, 95% CI 0.35-0.56; richest OR=0.37, 95% CI 0.28-0.48). Notably, the likelihood of pregnancy increases among contraceptive users (OR=3.48, 95% CI 2.84-4.26) and with age progression (20-24 years: OR=13.44, 95% CI 11.46-15.77; 25-29 years: OR=74.91, 95% CI 57.87-96.96).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>Pregnancy odds decline with higher education, wealth quintile, and literacy rate but rise with contraceptive use, radio listening, age, and mobile phone ownership.</p> <p><strong>Recommendation</strong></p> <p>Ensure Comprehensive education, sexual reproductive health campaigns, and initiatives empowering the youth.</p> Gabriel Wasswa James Kizza Copyright (c) 2024 Gabriel Wasswa, James Kizza https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2024-03-01 2024-03-01 5 3 13 13 10.51168/sjhrafrica.v5i3.1003